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BUFF LACED POLISH (Hen and Chick) - Sunday 7 (#4)
The bottom photo is the picture that inspired me to start raising chickens many years ago. I had never seen a fancy breed before and I just loved the way this bird looks.
The first go-around I bought leftover chicks from a feed store - Barred Rocks, a Cochin, Seabrights, and Cornishes. I still have most of them. Over time I ordered other breeds but Polish never fit into the plan.
Until now…
Ideal Hatchery offered baby chicks at $1 apiece and I bought the minimum. They are all “Top Hat” breeds. Polish, Houdan, Crevecoeur, Sultans. Really pretty birds.
Their prominent crest is caused by a protuberance, or knob, atop the bird’s skull, from which the feathers grow. 
The bottom chick photo is a white Crested Black Polish, and a Sultan. The Sultan will be solid white as an adult. It have all of the poultry bells and whistles - crest, beard, muff, extra toes, V-comb, blue ears (I think), 
The bottom hen is an adult White Crested Black Polish Chicken. Fashionable!
Zoom Info
BUFF LACED POLISH (Hen and Chick) - Sunday 7 (#4)
The bottom photo is the picture that inspired me to start raising chickens many years ago. I had never seen a fancy breed before and I just loved the way this bird looks.
The first go-around I bought leftover chicks from a feed store - Barred Rocks, a Cochin, Seabrights, and Cornishes. I still have most of them. Over time I ordered other breeds but Polish never fit into the plan.
Until now…
Ideal Hatchery offered baby chicks at $1 apiece and I bought the minimum. They are all “Top Hat” breeds. Polish, Houdan, Crevecoeur, Sultans. Really pretty birds.
Their prominent crest is caused by a protuberance, or knob, atop the bird’s skull, from which the feathers grow. 
The bottom chick photo is a white Crested Black Polish, and a Sultan. The Sultan will be solid white as an adult. It have all of the poultry bells and whistles - crest, beard, muff, extra toes, V-comb, blue ears (I think), 
The bottom hen is an adult White Crested Black Polish Chicken. Fashionable!
Zoom Info

BUFF LACED POLISH (Hen and Chick) - Sunday 7 (#4)

The bottom photo is the picture that inspired me to start raising chickens many years ago. I had never seen a fancy breed before and I just loved the way this bird looks.

The first go-around I bought leftover chicks from a feed store - Barred Rocks, a Cochin, Seabrights, and Cornishes. I still have most of them. Over time I ordered other breeds but Polish never fit into the plan.

Until now…

Ideal Hatchery offered baby chicks at $1 apiece and I bought the minimum. They are all “Top Hat” breeds. Polish, Houdan, Crevecoeur, Sultans. Really pretty birds.

Their prominent crest is caused by a protuberance, or knob, atop the bird’s skull, from which the feathers grow.

The bottom chick photo is a white Crested Black Polish, and a Sultan. The Sultan will be solid white as an adult. It have all of the poultry bells and whistles - crest, beard, muff, extra toes, V-comb, blue ears (I think),

The bottom hen is an adult White Crested Black Polish Chicken. Fashionable!

BALD HENS - Sunday 7 (#3)
These are some featherless hens I rescued on Saturday. They really look bad. A couple are so featherless that I’m not sure what color their feathers will be when they grow back in. The guy had a ton of roosters and these hens are partially denuded by over-breeding. Could also be parasites or a skin condition, so I’m addressing that as well.
Naked hens get sunburned.
I brought them home safely in a couple of boxes, however, one box fell apart as I was carrying it up the stairs and the bald hens ran all over the neighborhood before i could round them up again. Suckers are fast without feathers - more streamlined maybe?
They can relax now and eat, dust bathe and one is still laying eggs.
Zoom Info
Camera
Canon EOS REBEL T5i
ISO
100
Aperture
f/5.6
Exposure
1/60th
Focal Length
50mm

BALD HENS - Sunday 7 (#3)

These are some featherless hens I rescued on Saturday. They really look bad. A couple are so featherless that I’m not sure what color their feathers will be when they grow back in. The guy had a ton of roosters and these hens are partially denuded by over-breeding. Could also be parasites or a skin condition, so I’m addressing that as well.

Naked hens get sunburned.

I brought them home safely in a couple of boxes, however, one box fell apart as I was carrying it up the stairs and the bald hens ran all over the neighborhood before i could round them up again. Suckers are fast without feathers - more streamlined maybe?

They can relax now and eat, dust bathe and one is still laying eggs.

MAYA - Moving On :( - Sunday 7 (#2)
No, She’s not dead…she’s just no longer mine and that is exceedingly hard to process.
I made the hard decision last week to find another home for her. She was killing chickens and I didn’t want to have to keep her in a pen for the rest of her life. Killing is a very hard habit to break especially when one is not around all of the time to keep on top of it. I don’t know if she learned this behavior from Rajah, the old man dog i lost recently, but I can’t have it.So, I posted a notice on Facebook and the response was amazing.
A friend of a friend hooked me up with the owners of a 10 acre Alpaca and horse farm in Ridgecrest. So, early this morning I drove out to the high desert and dropped her off. Fingers crossed that she fits in. They have a 2-pound Chihuahua (I don’t think Maya realizes it’s a dog), and a 150 pound Maremma male whose is only 2 years old. She learned quickly if she barked at him he’d run and hide. I think that if she can adjust, she will be happy and do well here. Nice couple, the woman is a graphic designer (like me!) and the husband a retired engineer.
Coming home to just one dog was harder than I expected.
Zoom Info
Camera
Canon EOS REBEL T5i
ISO
400
Aperture
f/5.6
Exposure
1/60th
Focal Length
55mm

MAYA - Moving On :( - Sunday 7 (#2)

No, She’s not dead…she’s just no longer mine and that is exceedingly hard to process.

I made the hard decision last week to find another home for her. She was killing chickens and I didn’t want to have to keep her in a pen for the rest of her life. Killing is a very hard habit to break especially when one is not around all of the time to keep on top of it. I don’t know if she learned this behavior from Rajah, the old man dog i lost recently, but I can’t have it.

So, I posted a notice on Facebook and the response was amazing.

A friend of a friend hooked me up with the owners of a 10 acre Alpaca and horse farm in Ridgecrest. So, early this morning I drove out to the high desert and dropped her off. Fingers crossed that she fits in. They have a 2-pound Chihuahua (I don’t think Maya realizes it’s a dog), and a 150 pound Maremma male whose is only 2 years old. She learned quickly if she barked at him he’d run and hide. I think that if she can adjust, she will be happy and do well here. Nice couple, the woman is a graphic designer (like me!) and the husband a retired engineer.

Coming home to just one dog was harder than I expected.

SUNDAY SEVEN - 1
Pictured above are day-old India Blue pea-chicks (baby peacocks for the non-poultry crowd). Apparently they are nearly impossible to keep alive to maturity, but what the hell, I’ll give it a go. Cross your fingers for me! They are noisy little buggers (though sleeping currently).
The second photo shows a size comparison - they are the same size as 2 week old [standard breed] chicken chicks.
Zoom Info
SUNDAY SEVEN - 1
Pictured above are day-old India Blue pea-chicks (baby peacocks for the non-poultry crowd). Apparently they are nearly impossible to keep alive to maturity, but what the hell, I’ll give it a go. Cross your fingers for me! They are noisy little buggers (though sleeping currently).
The second photo shows a size comparison - they are the same size as 2 week old [standard breed] chicken chicks.
Zoom Info

SUNDAY SEVEN - 1

Pictured above are day-old India Blue pea-chicks (baby peacocks for the non-poultry crowd). Apparently they are nearly impossible to keep alive to maturity, but what the hell, I’ll give it a go. Cross your fingers for me! They are noisy little buggers (though sleeping currently).

The second photo shows a size comparison - they are the same size as 2 week old [standard breed] chicken chicks.

thewandw:

Deaths heads are on their way. If you didn’t get a chance to read the pre-order description in the excitement of placing a pre-order it states that they will be dispatched around the middle of August and we’re still on track to get them out for then! We’re working to get them out as soon as possible but you should receive yours in the next few weeks. The remaining deaths heads will be available at the start of September.

Kind of cool and kind of creepy - also the moths from Silence of the Lambs...think Hannibal Lechter received his in a pizza box? Hmm… THey are pretty though

First Year Teacher

justasmirk:

My first day as a teacher is 2 weeks away. We don’t even have paper at my school. I can figure out how to do without, but it sure would be nice to have the basics. It’s eating me up to even post this, but if you have a few dollars to spare, I’ll be forever in your debt. I will find a way to give back to anyone who can help, even with a reblog. I’ll sing at your wedding or dance a jig or something.

Help a new teacher out?!

HOLLYWOOD BOWL - from the cheap seats…
We saw Hair, it was okay, even the nude folks were small on the big screen from this distance. Damn!
Oh, and it rained the entire second half which was lovely. We got WET but it wasn’t cold. In other news the humidity lately is off the charts. Nice for curly hair.
Zoom Info
Camera
iPhone 4S
ISO
80
Aperture
f/2.4
Exposure
1/20th
Focal Length
4mm

HOLLYWOOD BOWL - from the cheap seats…

We saw Hair, it was okay, even the nude folks were small on the big screen from this distance. Damn!

Oh, and it rained the entire second half which was lovely. We got WET but it wasn’t cold. In other news the humidity lately is off the charts. Nice for curly hair.

colourlifephotography:

Oaxacan cuisine is a regional cuisine of Mexico, centered on the city of Oaxaca, the capital of the state of the same name located in southern Mexico. Like the rest of Mexican cuisine, Oaxacan food is based on staples such as corn, beans and chili peppers, but there is a great variety of other ingredients and food preparations due to the influence of the state’s varied geography and indigenous cultures. Well known features of the cuisine include ingredients such as chocolate (often drunk in a hot preparation with spices and other flavorings), Oaxaca cheese, mezcal and grasshoppers (chapulines) with dishes such as tlayudas, Oaxacan style tamales and seven notable varieties of mole sauce.

Love Oaxaca, best crafts (IMHO) in all of Mexico, and that’s saying something. Also the cuisine. Mostly the wonderful rainbow array of moles. I have tried chapulines - grasshoppers - a regional favorite fortunately with enough spice so they tasted like, well crunchy spice…which is good as I’m terrified of anything grasshopper / cricket / katydid-like, at least when they are alive
Zoom Info
Camera
SONY ILCE-3500
ISO
100
Aperture
f/7.1
Exposure
1/50th
Focal Length
50mm

colourlifephotography:

Oaxacan cuisine is a regional cuisine of Mexico, centered on the city of Oaxaca, the capital of the state of the same name located in southern Mexico. Like the rest of Mexican cuisine, Oaxacan food is based on staples such as corn, beans and chili peppers, but there is a great variety of other ingredients and food preparations due to the influence of the state’s varied geography and indigenous cultures. Well known features of the cuisine include ingredients such as chocolate (often drunk in a hot preparation with spices and other flavorings), Oaxaca cheesemezcal and grasshoppers (chapulines) with dishes such as tlayudas, Oaxacan style tamales and seven notable varieties of mole sauce.

Love Oaxaca, best crafts (IMHO) in all of Mexico, and that’s saying something. Also the cuisine. Mostly the wonderful rainbow array of moles. I have tried chapulines - grasshoppers - a regional favorite fortunately with enough spice so they tasted like, well crunchy spice…which is good as I’m terrified of anything grasshopper / cricket / katydid-like, at least when they are alive

Nancy Drew, amateur sleuth

This morning a neighbor alerted the residents that truckloads of construction debris were coming into the canyon fast and furious and being dumped onto private land. 

This has been going on for awhile and I wasn’t certain what they were talking about. So I collected a neighbor and we drove up to see what was going on. There were trucks literally arriving every couple of minutes full and leaving a few minutes later, empty. Repeat arrivals every 10 - 15 minutes.

We knew the source had to be local.

So we followed a departing truck, staying far back and winding through the adjacent canyon. At one point we lost the truck and pulled off the road to wait. Sure enough, another truck came by. 

The trick is staying far enough back to not seem obvious but close enough to see where they turn. Not so easy as it turns out. Required some doubling back and driving past when they turned down quiet streets until they turned again.

Eventually, we found the heart of the outfit.

As it turned out, it wasn’t that hard to identify them, they were using their own trucks. The company name and number is written on all of their trucks. The scary thing is that they are a roll-off outfit, and instead of disposing of the rubbish properly (as they are paid to do), they are dumping the crap in our backyard.

The sheriff has been notified, whether they will do anything or not remains to be seen.

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