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Time passes slowly when you’re inside a hippo
Paul Templer
http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2013/may/04/i-was-swallowed-by-a-hippo

From “The Dangerous Hippo,” Science Digest, LXXVI (November, 1974), 80-86, by George W. Frame and Lory Herbison Frame:

Nearly all of the famous African explorers and hunters—Livingstone, Stanley, Burton, Selous, Speke, DuChaillu—had boating mishaps with hippos. All considered the hippo to be a wantonly malicious beast. Not long ago Spencer Tyron, a white hunter, was killed while hunting near the shores of Lake Rukwa, Tanzania. A bull hippo turned over the dugout canoe from which Tyron was shooting, and bit off his head and shoulders.

WEST AFRICAN CROWNED CRANE
Balearica pavonina
Los Angeles Zoo, California
©Laura Quick

The Legend: How the Crane Got Its Crown

According to an African legend, a great chief became lost while hunting with his court in the heat of the summer. He quickly became weak from lack of water and food. He asked several passing animals, such as Zebra, Elephant, and Antelope, if they would help him find the oasis where his court was camping. All refused because he had hunted them. Finally, a flock of cranes flew by and agreed to help him. They brought the chief water and then led him to his court. As a reward, he had his goldsmith make each crane a gold crown. The next day, the cranes appeared without the crowns and explained to the chief that the other animals were jealous and had stolen and destroyed the crowns. The chief then called for his court magician, who touched each crane on the top of the head. From the place where the crane was touched grew its crown of gold feathers. More

PINEAPPLES
Malindi, Kenya
©Laura Quick

My new guy friend grew up on a pineapple plantation in the Philippines. His father worked for a US Corp based in CA. He lived an idlyllic colonial lifestyle all but gone, even at the time - US compound with private schools, servants, etc. When he was 12, his Dad got transferred stateside and the family traveled around the world before moving to California.

This photo was taken in Kenya marketplace. I liked the lighting, and the aroma of the pineapples in the African sun was amazing.

THE SCORPION VILLAS BEACH RESORT
Malindi, Kenya
©Laura Quick

I stayed here awhile back, it was as relaxing as it looks. The Scorpio Villas Beach Resort is a small, attractive hotel, offering accommodation in Lamu-style, thatched cottages, furnished with hand-carved furniture. The villas are set in beautiful tropical gardens, an easy walk along the sea front, from the centre of Malindi Town at the historic Vasco da Gama point.

Malindi is situated on the scenic North Coast of Kenya, 140 kms.North of Mombasa. More

Say AHHHHHHHHHHHH ——then run
animalworld:

SHOEBILL STORK - Yikes!Balaeniceps rex© Zdeněk Chalupa 
I couldn’t resist - these pre-historic looking birds never cease to amaze me :)
This species was only classified in the 19th century when some skins  were brought to Europe.  It was not until years later that live  specimens reached the scientific  community. However, the bird was known  to both ancient Egyptians and Arabs. There are Egyptian images depicting the Shoebill, while the Arabs referred to the bird as abu markub, which means one with a shoe, a reference to the bird’s distinctive bill.
Shoebills feed in muddy waters, preying on fish, frogs, reptiles such  as baby crocodiles, and small mammals. They nest on the ground and lay  from 1 to 3 eggs, usually during the dry season.
The population is estimated at between 5,000 and 8,000 individuals,  the majority of which live in Sudan. BirdLife International have  classified it as Vulnerable with the main threats being habitat  destruction, disturbance and hunting.
Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shoebill
Other posts:
Threatening Shoebill
Judging Shoebill
Shoebill moving aside a duck
Zoom Info
Camera
Canon EOS 350D DIGITAL
ISO
200
Aperture
f/5.6
Exposure
1/60th
Focal Length
86mm

Say AHHHHHHHHHHHH ——then run

animalworld:

SHOEBILL STORK - Yikes!
Balaeniceps rex
© Zdeněk Chalupa 

I couldn’t resist - these pre-historic looking birds never cease to amaze me :)

This species was only classified in the 19th century when some skins were brought to Europe. It was not until years later that live specimens reached the scientific community. However, the bird was known to both ancient Egyptians and Arabs. There are Egyptian images depicting the Shoebill, while the Arabs referred to the bird as abu markub, which means one with a shoe, a reference to the bird’s distinctive bill.

Shoebills feed in muddy waters, preying on fish, frogs, reptiles such as baby crocodiles, and small mammals. They nest on the ground and lay from 1 to 3 eggs, usually during the dry season.

The population is estimated at between 5,000 and 8,000 individuals, the majority of which live in Sudan. BirdLife International have classified it as Vulnerable with the main threats being habitat destruction, disturbance and hunting.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shoebill

Other posts:

Threatening Shoebill

Judging Shoebill

Shoebill moving aside a duck

harvestheart:

1st photo by gusjer via FlickrEthiopia, Mursi people
2nd phot by * hiro008 via Flickr

LIP PLATE - body modification extraordinnaire

Although there are many independent cultures who have at some point donned lip plates, there is only one remaining tribe that still actively practices lip stretching: the Mursi tribe in Ethiopia.

According to tradition, six months to a year before a girl is to be married, a small incision is made in the middle of her bottom lip and a stick is put in. Slowly over time, larger disks are inserted until her lip is stretched big enough to be used for a basketball hoop. In addition, many girls have their two lower teeth knocked out to accommodate the huge plate. Rationale behind this practice is unclear to anthropologists. Other than the inherent disfigurement and pain, many Mursi women have trouble speaking normally and often drool since they essentially have no lip or teeth on the bottom of their mouth. One Darwinian-ish theory is that the practice was started so women could prove their strength, and therefore worth, as wives and mothers. The bigger the lip plate, the more physical strife the woman is able to withstand, and the stronger she’ll be as a partner to her husband. Although there are many unknowns about lip plates, one thing is for sure: Mursi men seem to love it. For the women of this tribe, getting a lip plate is the only hope they have for a decent marriage: the bigger the lip, the more desirable a woman is, and the more cattle the groom’s family has to “trade” for him to get a wife. Along with limited marriage potential if they chose a life sans lip plate, Mursi women also face added pressure from the outside world to continue with the practice.

Currently the Mursi struggle to survive economically and face drought and worsening agricultural conditions. Ironically, their lip plates and reputation as an “untouched” African people have led to an exceptional amount of tourism in their home in the Omo Valley of Ethiopia and are currently helping to sustain the Mursi financially. 

Add to cultural/tourism practices I don’t understand.

From Scimix.com - 6,000 years old, Sunland Baobab, Limpopo Province, South Africa. Because baobabs don’t produce annual rings, Sunland Baobab was carbon dated.

Here’s what was going on in the world when this tree was born…

The 4th millennium BC saw major changes in human culture. It marked the beginning of the Bronze Age and of writing.

The city states of Sumer and the kingdom of Egypt were established and grew to prominence. Agriculture spread widely across Eurasia. World population in the course of the millennium doubled, approximately from 7 to 14 million people.

©Sebastiao Salgado: Boys in a caveAFRICA - 04/28/2009 - 10/01/2009Peter Fetterman Gallery is pleased to present the exhibition Africa by renowned photographer Sebastiao Salgado. Boys fleeing from southern Sudan  to avoid being forced to fight in the civil war. heading for the refugee  camps of northern Kenya. Southern Sudan1993
Zoom Info
Camera
Canon PowerShot SD500
Aperture
f/2.8
Exposure
1/40th
Focal Length
37mm

©Sebastiao Salgado: Boys in a cave
AFRICA
- 04/28/2009 - 10/01/2009
Peter Fetterman Gallery is pleased to present the exhibition Africa by renowned photographer Sebastiao Salgado.
Boys fleeing from southern Sudan to avoid being forced to fight in the civil war. heading for the refugee camps of northern Kenya. Southern Sudan
1993

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