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teenytinydinosaurfarm:

IRIDESCENT FEATHERS
Before I kept chickens I always thought of them as rather drab birds that ran around farm yards, and I rarely considered roosters at all. I was so short-sighted! This is a Brown Leghorn Rooster  showing his back from shoulder (top) to tail (bottom) - gorgeous.

Plain old black and orange chicken, but in the right light, gorgeous! Gotta love iridescence. Thank you Mother Nature!
Zoom Info
Camera
iPhone 4S
ISO
100
Aperture
f/2.4
Exposure
1/20th
Focal Length
4mm

teenytinydinosaurfarm:

IRIDESCENT FEATHERS

Before I kept chickens I always thought of them as rather drab birds that ran around farm yards, and I rarely considered roosters at all. I was so short-sighted! This is a Brown Leghorn Rooster  showing his back from shoulder (top) to tail (bottom) - gorgeous.

Plain old black and orange chicken, but in the right light, gorgeous! Gotta love iridescence. Thank you Mother Nature!

LAYING HEN
Amazingly, this happens 50-60 times a day at my house these days. This hen is lucky to get a nesting box all to herself — oft times they pile in 3-4 high and shriek at each other. It’s a lovely sound. lol. 
I like the look of panic on the hen’s face — YOU aren’t going to come in here are you? No? Good, now move along, move along, nothing to see here. Also one of the best photos I’ve ever taken with my POS iPhone4.
Zoom Info
Camera
iPhone 4S
ISO
800
Aperture
f/2.4
Exposure
1/15th
Focal Length
4mm

LAYING HEN

Amazingly, this happens 50-60 times a day at my house these days. This hen is lucky to get a nesting box all to herself — oft times they pile in 3-4 high and shriek at each other. It’s a lovely sound. lol.

I like the look of panic on the hen’s face — YOU aren’t going to come in here are you? No? Good, now move along, move along, nothing to see here. Also one of the best photos I’ve ever taken with my POS iPhone4.

MODIFIED COQ AU VINliterally Rooster in wine
The French, man they know their way around tenderizing tough meat. This is terrific.
Organically raised roosters — no steroids, no crap food, no tiny cages, no saline injected into the meat. These bad boy lived with me so I know their life story intimately.
I had them butchered* and cleaned professionally. Rooster has to be rested and aged before eating or it will be very tough.
I cut them up first then brined them for 3 days in wine, herbs, cajun spices, olive oil and salt. Today I baked them in a modified Dutch Oven in wine, herbs, spices and olive oil. I skipped the heavy cream in the original recipe, but DAMN! Yum.
This dish? It’s something to crow about, and fall off the bone tender. Great flavor too.
I thought I would be squeamish, but instead I’m deeply grateful.
There are three roosters in this pot, anyone want to join me?
—-
*having the birds butchered was a very difficult decision to make as I raise my birds from chicks/eggs and interact with them daily. Sadly, too many roosters are hard on the hen flock. Unless the hen is willing, and sometimes they are, a rooster will grab a hen by the head and drag her down, then stand on her back grabbing onto her neck feathers with his beak and her back feathers with his claws while mating with her. When you have too many roosters - several will breed with her at the same time. The hens end up bald with featherless necks and backs. 
Roosters penned together can get along, but they can also turn on a dime and fight until they are both bloody. This happened recently here among two roosters who had lived together for 3 years in peace. 
In this case, a farmer hired me to incubate out a bunch of chicks for him last winter, he never came for them. I sold off some, but ended up keeping the rest including with a slew of roosters. I would not sell a rooster chick intentionally to an unsuspecting neighbor or local. There are people who do, but it’s a crappy thing to do.
I didn’t want the bird to go to waste.
Zoom Info
Camera
Canon EOS REBEL T5i
ISO
400
Aperture
f/4.5
Exposure
1/60th
Focal Length
34mm

MODIFIED COQ AU VIN
literally Rooster in wine

The French, man they know their way around tenderizing tough meat. This is terrific.

Organically raised roosters — no steroids, no crap food, no tiny cages, no saline injected into the meat. These bad boy lived with me so I know their life story intimately.

I had them butchered* and cleaned professionally. Rooster has to be rested and aged before eating or it will be very tough.

I cut them up first then brined them for 3 days in wine, herbs, cajun spices, olive oil and salt. Today I baked them in a modified Dutch Oven in wine, herbs, spices and olive oil. I skipped the heavy cream in the original recipe, but DAMN! Yum.

This dish? It’s something to crow about, and fall off the bone tender. Great flavor too.

I thought I would be squeamish, but instead I’m deeply grateful.

There are three roosters in this pot, anyone want to join me?

—-

*having the birds butchered was a very difficult decision to make as I raise my birds from chicks/eggs and interact with them daily. Sadly, too many roosters are hard on the hen flock. Unless the hen is willing, and sometimes they are, a rooster will grab a hen by the head and drag her down, then stand on her back grabbing onto her neck feathers with his beak and her back feathers with his claws while mating with her. When you have too many roosters - several will breed with her at the same time. The hens end up bald with featherless necks and backs.

Roosters penned together can get along, but they can also turn on a dime and fight until they are both bloody. This happened recently here among two roosters who had lived together for 3 years in peace.

In this case, a farmer hired me to incubate out a bunch of chicks for him last winter, he never came for them. I sold off some, but ended up keeping the rest including with a slew of roosters. I would not sell a rooster chick intentionally to an unsuspecting neighbor or local. There are people who do, but it’s a crappy thing to do.

I didn’t want the bird to go to waste.

BIG MAMA
My very favorite hen died this week. I’m so thankful that she as a part of my flock.
She was a big ole’ Buff Brahma and the mellowest hen I’ve ever had. She arrived when my flock was young and mothered the growing chicks.
Upon her arrival she took note of the pecking order, walked over to the lead hen, pecked her once and took over as lead hen.
She was the first hen to lay an egg
She was the first hen to brood chicks
She was a great mama, both a dedicated brooder and unlike most hens, she never left her chicks, she stayed with them as they grew up and hung out with them for the rest of her life.
Her DNA is in all of the gentle roosters I have.
I miss her already.
Zoom Info
Camera
Canon EOS DIGITAL REBEL XTi
ISO
400
Aperture
f/5.6
Exposure
1/60th
Focal Length
55mm

BIG MAMA

My very favorite hen died this week. I’m so thankful that she as a part of my flock.

She was a big ole’ Buff Brahma and the mellowest hen I’ve ever had. She arrived when my flock was young and mothered the growing chicks.

Upon her arrival she took note of the pecking order, walked over to the lead hen, pecked her once and took over as lead hen.

She was the first hen to lay an egg

She was the first hen to brood chicks

She was a great mama, both a dedicated brooder and unlike most hens, she never left her chicks, she stayed with them as they grew up and hung out with them for the rest of her life.

Her DNA is in all of the gentle roosters I have.

I miss her already.

GPOY - Chick Edition
Top: Blue (Splash) Andalusian Rooster lends a wing to an errant chick the literally flew the coop. The rooster is fully feathered, the little one is not and needs the warmth.
Center: Three of the many
Bottom: Partial shot of the many, this hatch. 31 or so of 47 hatched successfully. There are still one or two in the incubator working on hatching. The dark chick in the foreground was not fully dry when I took the photo.
—-
These are from one day’s worth of eggs - so while some of the chicks may share a Papa’s DNA, each is from a unique hen.
Zoom Info
GPOY - Chick Edition
Top: Blue (Splash) Andalusian Rooster lends a wing to an errant chick the literally flew the coop. The rooster is fully feathered, the little one is not and needs the warmth.
Center: Three of the many
Bottom: Partial shot of the many, this hatch. 31 or so of 47 hatched successfully. There are still one or two in the incubator working on hatching. The dark chick in the foreground was not fully dry when I took the photo.
—-
These are from one day’s worth of eggs - so while some of the chicks may share a Papa’s DNA, each is from a unique hen.
Zoom Info
GPOY - Chick Edition
Top: Blue (Splash) Andalusian Rooster lends a wing to an errant chick the literally flew the coop. The rooster is fully feathered, the little one is not and needs the warmth.
Center: Three of the many
Bottom: Partial shot of the many, this hatch. 31 or so of 47 hatched successfully. There are still one or two in the incubator working on hatching. The dark chick in the foreground was not fully dry when I took the photo.
—-
These are from one day’s worth of eggs - so while some of the chicks may share a Papa’s DNA, each is from a unique hen.
Zoom Info

GPOY - Chick Edition

Top: Blue (Splash) Andalusian Rooster lends a wing to an errant chick the literally flew the coop. The rooster is fully feathered, the little one is not and needs the warmth.

Center: Three of the many

Bottom: Partial shot of the many, this hatch. 31 or so of 47 hatched successfully. There are still one or two in the incubator working on hatching. The dark chick in the foreground was not fully dry when I took the photo.

—-

These are from one day’s worth of eggs - so while some of the chicks may share a Papa’s DNA, each is from a unique hen.

CREAM BRABANTERS
My chicks top, a gorgeous adult ©Showmesilkies I’m hoping to have a couple with light beards like this one, many have a black beard. 
The Brabanter is a Dutch breed of chicken originating in the historic region of Brabant which straddles Belgium and the Netherlands. In a few paintings from the 1670s by Dutch artist Melchior d’Hondecoeter, appear what would seem to be Brabanters. The original form of the Brabanter nearly went extinct in the early 20th century. The few remaining birds were interbred with their close relative, the Dutch Owlbeard, and the breed was recreated by 1920. credit: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brabanter
Zoom Info
CREAM BRABANTERS
My chicks top, a gorgeous adult ©Showmesilkies I’m hoping to have a couple with light beards like this one, many have a black beard. 
The Brabanter is a Dutch breed of chicken originating in the historic region of Brabant which straddles Belgium and the Netherlands. In a few paintings from the 1670s by Dutch artist Melchior d’Hondecoeter, appear what would seem to be Brabanters. The original form of the Brabanter nearly went extinct in the early 20th century. The few remaining birds were interbred with their close relative, the Dutch Owlbeard, and the breed was recreated by 1920. credit: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brabanter
Zoom Info

CREAM BRABANTERS

My chicks top, a gorgeous adult ©Showmesilkies I’m hoping to have a couple with light beards like this one, many have a black beard.

The Brabanter is a Dutch breed of chicken originating in the historic region of Brabant which straddles Belgium and the Netherlands. In a few paintings from the 1670s by Dutch artist Melchior d’Hondecoeter, appear what would seem to be Brabanters. The original form of the Brabanter nearly went extinct in the early 20th century. The few remaining birds were interbred with their close relative, the Dutch Owlbeard, and the breed was recreated by 1920. credit: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brabanter

TT - #3 PORCELAIN D’UCCLE (Duh-Clay) hen
A few weeks ago Bella and I visited a farm about an hour up the road, where she met other dogs that look just like her, and I picked up some chicks. This is one the farmers threw in, as I just love her coloring and the fan of feathers on her feet. I didn’t want bantams, in fact I met these folks and traded my bantams for their fancy breeds, but as it turns out, I’m a color and pattern hen hoarder - is that a thing?
I am hoping that she will breed with a larger rooster (which is ALL of the current roosters) and that her color will crop up in standard sized birds. Cuz little eggs, who needs em? :)
Zoom Info
Camera
Canon EOS REBEL T5i
ISO
1600
Aperture
f/5.6
Exposure
1/60th
Focal Length
55mm

TT - #3 PORCELAIN D’UCCLE (Duh-Clay) hen

A few weeks ago Bella and I visited a farm about an hour up the road, where she met other dogs that look just like her, and I picked up some chicks. This is one the farmers threw in, as I just love her coloring and the fan of feathers on her feet. I didn’t want bantams, in fact I met these folks and traded my bantams for their fancy breeds, but as it turns out, I’m a color and pattern hen hoarder - is that a thing?

I am hoping that she will breed with a larger rooster (which is ALL of the current roosters) and that her color will crop up in standard sized birds. Cuz little eggs, who needs em? :)

A Possible Doukey?
VasolineJesus was looking for a Halloween kid deterrent…and all this time I have had the answer in my yard. This Nankin rooster I call him Jackass, but we can change his name to Doukey…he’s the smallest natural breed of chicken so about a pound of trouble, and S-H-R-I-L-L, Shit Howdy can he screech. I have two of them, so they can come as a matched set or individually. Even the Nankin hens avoid them.
Zoom Info
Camera
Canon EOS DIGITAL REBEL XTi
ISO
800
Aperture
f/8
Exposure
1/125th
Focal Length
25mm

A Possible Doukey?

VasolineJesus was looking for a Halloween kid deterrent…and all this time I have had the answer in my yard. This Nankin rooster I call him Jackass, but we can change his name to Doukey…he’s the smallest natural breed of chicken so about a pound of trouble, and S-H-R-I-L-L, Shit Howdy can he screech. I have two of them, so they can come as a matched set or individually. Even the Nankin hens avoid them.

Scowling Rooster is Scowly
Lol, this is the happy face of my Brahma Rooster “Big Red” after I rescued him. He’d gotten himself wedged between the back of the pen and the wall — took me two hours to get him free and required real tools. Despite his cross look, he’s the gentlest rooster I have.
Zoom Info
Camera
Canon EOS DIGITAL REBEL XTi
ISO
200
Aperture
f/5.6
Exposure
1/60th
Focal Length
80mm

Scowling Rooster is Scowly

Lol, this is the happy face of my Brahma Rooster “Big Red” after I rescued him. He’d gotten himself wedged between the back of the pen and the wall — took me two hours to get him free and required real tools. Despite his cross look, he’s the gentlest rooster I have.

BONSAI - Blue Cochin Pullet
I keep a book of all my chickens. I do. Each bird has a spread - when and where they were born, a baby picture, a juvenile photo and an adult photo. Notes about them - broody? Good layer? Age? Parents? With over 100 birds now, it’s important to keep track of them all and that is much easier on paper.
The pullet pictured was a cause for concern earlier this week. I’ve noticed that her pupil is not round, which can be a sign of Marek’s disease, which can in turn wipe out a flock. There is no cure. I was facing the decision of risking it by keeping her, or of culling her.
I no longer have to make that decision, it was made for me. She was killed by one of my dogs. A neighbor came by last night and told me that there was a big commotion at the house while I was out. Apparently, a coyote was up against the fence which got my dogs going and they in turn started fighting with each other. Twice. Bad fighting — which they have never done before in my presence. Bad enough that she heard it a few houses away and came up to stop it.
I knew none of this, when I arrived home though, there were two birds from different flocks outside the fence, and this bird was dead. At lights out, I did a count and found I was also down a Delaware pullet. This morning I found her feathers in the park, a coyote got her.
I know that livestock keeping is not for the faint-hearted, and knew going in that there were plenty of predators in the area. I don’t expect my dogs to kill the birds. My older dog has on a couple of occasions, they younger dog, never. And I imagine that the fighting was as much over the coyote as over who got the spoils.
Losing an animal never gets easier. And it’s never the annoying rooster that gets killed, it’s always the favorite hen.
Zoom Info
Camera
Canon EOS DIGITAL REBEL XTi
ISO
100
Aperture
f/5.6
Exposure
1/60th
Focal Length
80mm

BONSAI - Blue Cochin Pullet

I keep a book of all my chickens. I do. Each bird has a spread - when and where they were born, a baby picture, a juvenile photo and an adult photo. Notes about them - broody? Good layer? Age? Parents? With over 100 birds now, it’s important to keep track of them all and that is much easier on paper.

The pullet pictured was a cause for concern earlier this week. I’ve noticed that her pupil is not round, which can be a sign of Marek’s disease, which can in turn wipe out a flock. There is no cure. I was facing the decision of risking it by keeping her, or of culling her.

I no longer have to make that decision, it was made for me. She was killed by one of my dogs. A neighbor came by last night and told me that there was a big commotion at the house while I was out. Apparently, a coyote was up against the fence which got my dogs going and they in turn started fighting with each other. Twice. Bad fighting — which they have never done before in my presence. Bad enough that she heard it a few houses away and came up to stop it.

I knew none of this, when I arrived home though, there were two birds from different flocks outside the fence, and this bird was dead. At lights out, I did a count and found I was also down a Delaware pullet. This morning I found her feathers in the park, a coyote got her.

I know that livestock keeping is not for the faint-hearted, and knew going in that there were plenty of predators in the area. I don’t expect my dogs to kill the birds. My older dog has on a couple of occasions, they younger dog, never. And I imagine that the fighting was as much over the coyote as over who got the spoils.

Losing an animal never gets easier. And it’s never the annoying rooster that gets killed, it’s always the favorite hen.

CHICKENS 101:  BEARDS AND MUFFS…and TUFTS
Muff? Yup - the side whiskery things…not to be confused with tufts.Top Bird: From my flock. 19 week old Ameracauna Pullet - no beard, no muff
Center Bird: From my flock. 19 week old Salmon Faverolles* - full beard, full muff (poor coloring to breed but that’s another topic)
Bottom Bird: Not Mine. Aracauna with Ear Tufts Photo Credit. Aracauna’s are the only breed [I know of] that have ear tufts.
—-
*Faverolles is always plural as it is the name of a city in France.
Zoom Info
CHICKENS 101:  BEARDS AND MUFFS…and TUFTS
Muff? Yup - the side whiskery things…not to be confused with tufts.Top Bird: From my flock. 19 week old Ameracauna Pullet - no beard, no muff
Center Bird: From my flock. 19 week old Salmon Faverolles* - full beard, full muff (poor coloring to breed but that’s another topic)
Bottom Bird: Not Mine. Aracauna with Ear Tufts Photo Credit. Aracauna’s are the only breed [I know of] that have ear tufts.
—-
*Faverolles is always plural as it is the name of a city in France.
Zoom Info

CHICKENS 101:  BEARDS AND MUFFS…and TUFTS

Muff? Yup - the side whiskery things…not to be confused with tufts.

Top Bird: From my flock. 19 week old Ameracauna Pullet - no beard, no muff

Center Bird: From my flock. 19 week old Salmon Faverolles* - full beard, full muff (poor coloring to breed but that’s another topic)

Bottom Bird: Not Mine. Aracauna with Ear Tufts Photo Credit. Aracauna’s are the only breed [I know of] that have ear tufts.

—-

*Faverolles is always plural as it is the name of a city in France.

BIG WHITE PULLET* - Cross Easter Egger Roo and Light Brahma Hen
I’m very pleased with this little lady. She’s from my first hatch this year, she’s a wonderful cross of Ameracauna muff and beard, willow green legs, and Light Brahma size and patterning. Hopefully she’ll starting laying in the next week or two, and maybe, if I’m lucky her eggs will be olive green - fingers crossed.
*Pullet is a female chicken that has not begun laying eggs yet. Once she lays, she’ll become a hen. There will be a “flying up” ceremony, like we had in Brownies. :)
P.S. The butt, front-left is a Blue Cochin pullet, in case you were curious.
Zoom Info
Camera
Canon EOS DIGITAL REBEL XTi
ISO
400
Aperture
f/10
Exposure
1/200th
Focal Length
57mm

BIG WHITE PULLET* - Cross Easter Egger Roo and Light Brahma Hen

I’m very pleased with this little lady. She’s from my first hatch this year, she’s a wonderful cross of Ameracauna muff and beard, willow green legs, and Light Brahma size and patterning. Hopefully she’ll starting laying in the next week or two, and maybe, if I’m lucky her eggs will be olive green - fingers crossed.

*Pullet is a female chicken that has not begun laying eggs yet. Once she lays, she’ll become a hen. There will be a “flying up” ceremony, like we had in Brownies. :)

P.S. The butt, front-left is a Blue Cochin pullet, in case you were curious.

BIG REDAmeracauna Pullet©Laura Quick
One of the pullets just coming into lay this month. Fingers crossed that a dozen or two of the new girls will take on laying through the shorter, darker days. I’ve been lucky in the past, but this year I have more birds moulting and birds that have stopped for the winter. I don’t believe in using artificial light to keep birds laying.
This girl is gorgeous, full of fall color - so I named her after a gregarious college roommate - Autumn, who in not only colorful, but in turn was named after the song “Autumn Leaves”.
Zoom Info
Camera
Canon EOS DIGITAL REBEL XTi
ISO
400
Aperture
f/5.6
Exposure
1/60th
Focal Length
80mm

BIG RED
Ameracauna Pullet
©Laura Quick

One of the pullets just coming into lay this month. Fingers crossed that a dozen or two of the new girls will take on laying through the shorter, darker days. I’ve been lucky in the past, but this year I have more birds moulting and birds that have stopped for the winter. I don’t believe in using artificial light to keep birds laying.

This girl is gorgeous, full of fall color - so I named her after a gregarious college roommate - Autumn, who in not only colorful, but in turn was named after the song “Autumn Leaves”.

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