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BUFF LACED POLISH (Hen and Chick) - Sunday 7 (#4)
The bottom photo is the picture that inspired me to start raising chickens many years ago. I had never seen a fancy breed before and I just loved the way this bird looks.
The first go-around I bought leftover chicks from a feed store - Barred Rocks, a Cochin, Seabrights, and Cornishes. I still have most of them. Over time I ordered other breeds but Polish never fit into the plan.
Until now…
Ideal Hatchery offered baby chicks at $1 apiece and I bought the minimum. They are all “Top Hat” breeds. Polish, Houdan, Crevecoeur, Sultans. Really pretty birds.
Their prominent crest is caused by a protuberance, or knob, atop the bird’s skull, from which the feathers grow. 
The bottom chick photo is a white Crested Black Polish, and a Sultan. The Sultan will be solid white as an adult. It have all of the poultry bells and whistles - crest, beard, muff, extra toes, V-comb, blue ears (I think), 
The bottom hen is an adult White Crested Black Polish Chicken. Fashionable!
Zoom Info
BUFF LACED POLISH (Hen and Chick) - Sunday 7 (#4)
The bottom photo is the picture that inspired me to start raising chickens many years ago. I had never seen a fancy breed before and I just loved the way this bird looks.
The first go-around I bought leftover chicks from a feed store - Barred Rocks, a Cochin, Seabrights, and Cornishes. I still have most of them. Over time I ordered other breeds but Polish never fit into the plan.
Until now…
Ideal Hatchery offered baby chicks at $1 apiece and I bought the minimum. They are all “Top Hat” breeds. Polish, Houdan, Crevecoeur, Sultans. Really pretty birds.
Their prominent crest is caused by a protuberance, or knob, atop the bird’s skull, from which the feathers grow. 
The bottom chick photo is a white Crested Black Polish, and a Sultan. The Sultan will be solid white as an adult. It have all of the poultry bells and whistles - crest, beard, muff, extra toes, V-comb, blue ears (I think), 
The bottom hen is an adult White Crested Black Polish Chicken. Fashionable!
Zoom Info

BUFF LACED POLISH (Hen and Chick) - Sunday 7 (#4)

The bottom photo is the picture that inspired me to start raising chickens many years ago. I had never seen a fancy breed before and I just loved the way this bird looks.

The first go-around I bought leftover chicks from a feed store - Barred Rocks, a Cochin, Seabrights, and Cornishes. I still have most of them. Over time I ordered other breeds but Polish never fit into the plan.

Until now…

Ideal Hatchery offered baby chicks at $1 apiece and I bought the minimum. They are all “Top Hat” breeds. Polish, Houdan, Crevecoeur, Sultans. Really pretty birds.

Their prominent crest is caused by a protuberance, or knob, atop the bird’s skull, from which the feathers grow.

The bottom chick photo is a white Crested Black Polish, and a Sultan. The Sultan will be solid white as an adult. It have all of the poultry bells and whistles - crest, beard, muff, extra toes, V-comb, blue ears (I think),

The bottom hen is an adult White Crested Black Polish Chicken. Fashionable!

SUNDAY SEVEN - 1
Pictured above are day-old India Blue pea-chicks (baby peacocks for the non-poultry crowd). Apparently they are nearly impossible to keep alive to maturity, but what the hell, I’ll give it a go. Cross your fingers for me! They are noisy little buggers (though sleeping currently).
The second photo shows a size comparison - they are the same size as 2 week old [standard breed] chicken chicks.
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SUNDAY SEVEN - 1
Pictured above are day-old India Blue pea-chicks (baby peacocks for the non-poultry crowd). Apparently they are nearly impossible to keep alive to maturity, but what the hell, I’ll give it a go. Cross your fingers for me! They are noisy little buggers (though sleeping currently).
The second photo shows a size comparison - they are the same size as 2 week old [standard breed] chicken chicks.
Zoom Info

SUNDAY SEVEN - 1

Pictured above are day-old India Blue pea-chicks (baby peacocks for the non-poultry crowd). Apparently they are nearly impossible to keep alive to maturity, but what the hell, I’ll give it a go. Cross your fingers for me! They are noisy little buggers (though sleeping currently).

The second photo shows a size comparison - they are the same size as 2 week old [standard breed] chicken chicks.

teenytinydinosaurfarm:

BABY’S FIRST DUST BATH

My first video! I put a saucer of dirt in with a bunch of my day old chicks to see what they would do. Here they are…just being chicks. I love that dirt bathing is hard wired - these chicks have never seen a grown hen, it’s just instinct.

Highlight of my weekend…it’s the little things (and these guys are tiny!)

THE SAGA OF THE BLUE BABIES
First time hen dutifully sets on a nest for 21 days, then when the chicks start to hatch freaks out, tramples them and abandons the nest.
The chick that had already hatched was killed, I took the crushed eggs and put them in an incubator. Amazingly 4 of 5 of the little buggers hatched. (There’s a chance the 5th will hatch as well). 
I offered a chick the the new hen midday and she looked puzzled but didn’t seem to get it. I returned them to the incubator.
Last night I tried again, offered her one chick and she lifted up and let it run under her. I checked several times and as things were going well I gave her another. Now all 4 are back with their Mama.
If they survive until I get home, I will move them into a pen with a heater, so that if anything untoward happens, they will be okay. I’m guessing that having something run around underneath you could be a little creepy if you aren’t sure what’s going on…the hen seems calm now and is letting them climb all over her.
I’m just glad that she’s accepted the babies. There are two blue-black and two blue Ameracaunas. Pretty birds. I adopted 6 chicks in February — my luck, 5 turned out to be roosters. I call them the thugs. I’d love to have a few hens that look like them.
UPDATED: The 5th chick hatched, another blue. Mom and three blues shown in the new photo I added. The newest is the biggest, fattest chick. The little family is doing well :)
Zoom Info
THE SAGA OF THE BLUE BABIES
First time hen dutifully sets on a nest for 21 days, then when the chicks start to hatch freaks out, tramples them and abandons the nest.
The chick that had already hatched was killed, I took the crushed eggs and put them in an incubator. Amazingly 4 of 5 of the little buggers hatched. (There’s a chance the 5th will hatch as well). 
I offered a chick the the new hen midday and she looked puzzled but didn’t seem to get it. I returned them to the incubator.
Last night I tried again, offered her one chick and she lifted up and let it run under her. I checked several times and as things were going well I gave her another. Now all 4 are back with their Mama.
If they survive until I get home, I will move them into a pen with a heater, so that if anything untoward happens, they will be okay. I’m guessing that having something run around underneath you could be a little creepy if you aren’t sure what’s going on…the hen seems calm now and is letting them climb all over her.
I’m just glad that she’s accepted the babies. There are two blue-black and two blue Ameracaunas. Pretty birds. I adopted 6 chicks in February — my luck, 5 turned out to be roosters. I call them the thugs. I’d love to have a few hens that look like them.
UPDATED: The 5th chick hatched, another blue. Mom and three blues shown in the new photo I added. The newest is the biggest, fattest chick. The little family is doing well :)
Zoom Info

THE SAGA OF THE BLUE BABIES

First time hen dutifully sets on a nest for 21 days, then when the chicks start to hatch freaks out, tramples them and abandons the nest.

The chick that had already hatched was killed, I took the crushed eggs and put them in an incubator. Amazingly 4 of 5 of the little buggers hatched. (There’s a chance the 5th will hatch as well). 

I offered a chick the the new hen midday and she looked puzzled but didn’t seem to get it. I returned them to the incubator.

Last night I tried again, offered her one chick and she lifted up and let it run under her. I checked several times and as things were going well I gave her another. Now all 4 are back with their Mama.

If they survive until I get home, I will move them into a pen with a heater, so that if anything untoward happens, they will be okay. I’m guessing that having something run around underneath you could be a little creepy if you aren’t sure what’s going on…the hen seems calm now and is letting them climb all over her.

I’m just glad that she’s accepted the babies. There are two blue-black and two blue Ameracaunas. Pretty birds. I adopted 6 chicks in February — my luck, 5 turned out to be roosters. I call them the thugs. I’d love to have a few hens that look like them.

UPDATED: The 5th chick hatched, another blue. Mom and three blues shown in the new photo I added. The newest is the biggest, fattest chick. The little family is doing well :)

THEY GROW UP SO FAST!
They do. The littlest chick hatched yesterday, the brown chick a week ago, the two light colored chicks mid-week. I have two eggs pipping now…and seven total broody hens
Okay, who needs chicks?
Zoom Info
Camera
iPhone 4S
ISO
400
Aperture
f/2.4
Exposure
1/17th
Focal Length
4mm

THEY GROW UP SO FAST!

They do. The littlest chick hatched yesterday, the brown chick a week ago, the two light colored chicks mid-week. I have two eggs pipping now…and seven total broody hens

Okay, who needs chicks?

I realized yesterday…

That I’ve gone from a shitload of chickens to an embarrassment of chickens in a short period of time. Partially as the jackass that had me hatching out chicks for him, abandoned the last hatch — which left me with nearly 50 chicks I wasn’t expecting to have. Also a glut of roosters. I’ve exceeded my tipping point and need to bring balance back in line.

I tell you, they are like potato chips.

Truthful Tuesday alá Tres

Okay. Last Thursday I had a Craiglist exchange. Baby chicks for Organic wheat. I told the dude I had 40 chicks, he said how does 365 pounds of wheat sound? I said great. Deal. Deal. The night before I confirmed. 40 chicks, 365 bags of grain. Time. Location. Everything.

We met up in my office parking lot to exchange goods.

I pulled up, he was already here. I opened my car, he loaded wheat. I carried over chicks in a box and he loaded them into his car fastening the passenger seat belt around the box.

Then he turned to me and demanded $130. cash.

No, I said, this was an exchange

No, he says, you owe me money

I didn’t agree to this, I say, I agreed to a trade

Things got ugly fast. He started unloading grain bags from my car. I tried to close the door. Finally, I succeeded. I locked the car and walked into the building leaving him in the parking lot.

He left with the chicks and 120 pounds of grain.

I left with 240 pounds of wheat and no chicks.

A friend was smoking in the parking lot, otherwise everyone was already in the office.

Later in an email the Craigslist guy told me he was going to contact the company to get me fired.

—-

Today, I was called into HR.

What is this I hear about chicks and wheat? I wanted to laugh. The whole thing is so insane. How do I explain this? First, I apologize for doing personal business on company property, the HR guy says, Hey Craigslist, probably better to meet in a public place.

Okay.

Then I give him the basic facts. The HR guy looks like he’s trying not to laugh.

It turns out that like the kid’s game of Telephone, what actually happened and what has been reported bear little similarity. It was reported that I was kicking some guys ass in the parking lot. There was fisticuffs and shoving, screaming and all manner of carrying on. Uhm, no.

There was a question as to where I got the wheat, someone reported that the man was one of our vendors and that I was selling company organic wheat to buy myself chickens.

Then I did laugh.

And HR laughed

And we shook hands

And I came back to work.

But not before I reported that the crazy man from Craigslist might call about my stealing his wheat and wanting to get me fired.

—-

I came back in and asked my buddy, who saw the whole thing unravel what his take was. He said he was going to help but stayed back as I seemed to have the upper hand.

Also that now everyone upstairs is a little afraid of me and thinks I’m bad-ass, lol.

BLUE COCHIN HEN & CHICKS
This Blue Cochin is one of my favorite birds. Named Bonsai in honor of my friend Al (an avid gardener), they share the same birthday. She was a tidy broody mama and did me a favor by rolling the eggs out of the nest and piling them up by the door for easy removal as she decided to let them go. So far, she’s been great with the 4 babies she hatched out — a Blue Cochin, a Delaware, a Salmon Faverolles, and a Leghorn/Brahma cross.
TOP PHOTO: The mama hen will call the chicks over and pick up food for them then drop it for the babies to eat. In the top shot you can see the grain dropping (by the white chick’s foot)
BOTTOM PHOTO: In the lower shot the hen is digging with her foot, and the orange chick now has the grain in her mouth.The two closest chicks to the ground probably have their eyes closed given the amount of dust Mama’s foot will churn up.
The gray chick facing away is another blue Cochin, I am super-excited that the Mama’s genes came through on that one, the rooster is a Buff Brahma.

//
Zoom Info
BLUE COCHIN HEN & CHICKS
This Blue Cochin is one of my favorite birds. Named Bonsai in honor of my friend Al (an avid gardener), they share the same birthday. She was a tidy broody mama and did me a favor by rolling the eggs out of the nest and piling them up by the door for easy removal as she decided to let them go. So far, she’s been great with the 4 babies she hatched out — a Blue Cochin, a Delaware, a Salmon Faverolles, and a Leghorn/Brahma cross.
TOP PHOTO: The mama hen will call the chicks over and pick up food for them then drop it for the babies to eat. In the top shot you can see the grain dropping (by the white chick’s foot)
BOTTOM PHOTO: In the lower shot the hen is digging with her foot, and the orange chick now has the grain in her mouth.The two closest chicks to the ground probably have their eyes closed given the amount of dust Mama’s foot will churn up.
The gray chick facing away is another blue Cochin, I am super-excited that the Mama’s genes came through on that one, the rooster is a Buff Brahma.

//
Zoom Info

BLUE COCHIN HEN & CHICKS

This Blue Cochin is one of my favorite birds. Named Bonsai in honor of my friend Al (an avid gardener), they share the same birthday. She was a tidy broody mama and did me a favor by rolling the eggs out of the nest and piling them up by the door for easy removal as she decided to let them go. So far, she’s been great with the 4 babies she hatched out — a Blue Cochin, a Delaware, a Salmon Faverolles, and a Leghorn/Brahma cross.

TOP PHOTO: The mama hen will call the chicks over and pick up food for them then drop it for the babies to eat. In the top shot you can see the grain dropping (by the white chick’s foot)

BOTTOM PHOTO: In the lower shot the hen is digging with her foot, and the orange chick now has the grain in her mouth.The two closest chicks to the ground probably have their eyes closed given the amount of dust Mama’s foot will churn up.

The gray chick facing away is another blue Cochin, I am super-excited that the Mama’s genes came through on that one, the rooster is a Buff Brahma.

Truthful Thursday

  • Two of my roosters got into a fight. It was quick and I thought it was just posturing, but no…Blood EVERYWHERE. Both appear to be surviving the ordeal. Not sure where to put the loser in the fight. He’s currently in the bath tub. This is a temporary fix

  • The mama hen that was doing so well, abandoned her chick and it’s struggling — hard. It made it two days in the brooder and is now near death back in the incubator. Heartbreaking. Other abandoned eggs are hatching as we speak. Amazing that they survived.

  • My sister wants to put my Dad in an assisted living facility that is $11K a month. That’s $132K a year or more. Though he thinks he’s Daddy Warbucks, that’s the dementia speaking. I don’t know what she could possibly be thinking. I think she must be smoking crack. No one I know is paying more than $5K and in that case it’s a husband/wife both. This is Western Mass for God sake.

  • Tomorrow 40 chicks go to a new home and 365 pounds of organic red wheat come home in return. Great for foddering. Also 7 flats (210 eggs) head to the bakery.

  • In the last message from my Dad he threatened to break my arm, egged on by my sister. Now she wants a restraining order against me, (or court mandated calls), as I don’t call Dad often enough. He’s only awake the hours I’m at work.

  • I worked 10 hours today, and man was I cranky at the end of the day when I realized that:
    A) my boss went home midday as his kids are on spring break
    B) the account manager for the job left early to buy a birthday cake
    C) the client left early as she has an event tomorrow night in San Diego
    …so even if I finish the job, no one can sign off on it…

    Everything still needs to be completed and printed still. The crate ships in the AM for Canada and what makes it inside will go, everything else will be carried…the restis for a Vegas show next week, that crate ships Tuesday and they have shopped the job so much that now no one can do it in time to make the crate… Grr.

DARK BRAHMA ROO
This tiny rooster realized that he could crow this morning. This was taken just after he crowed for the first time. I like that he looks a little puzzled. He’s still warming up his vocal cords, but now from the safe distance of the greenhouse. Youngest rooster to crow that I’ve ever had. And Brahmas tend to mature slowly. Yikes, lol.

//
Zoom Info
Camera
Canon EOS REBEL T5i
ISO
100
Aperture
f/6.3
Exposure
1/100th
Focal Length
55mm

DARK BRAHMA ROO

This tiny rooster realized that he could crow this morning. This was taken just after he crowed for the first time. I like that he looks a little puzzled. He’s still warming up his vocal cords, but now from the safe distance of the greenhouse. Youngest rooster to crow that I’ve ever had. And Brahmas tend to mature slowly. Yikes, lol.

Five for Friday - Chick Edition

  1. Chicks - I’m knee deep in ‘em
    65 replacement arrives this AM
    30 hatched out for a friend
    3 broody hens on at least a dozen each (1 on 30)
    36 eggs in the incubator set to hatch this weekend (i hear cheeping!)

  2. One of the groups of chicks I brought in carried Mycoplasma Gallisepticum, it may have been from the hatchery, or from one of three farms I’m in contact with. It spread through my flock like crazy. Most likely I was the carrier from pen to pen. I’ve treated everyone large and small, and hope that’s the end of it. Birds dying, getting infected eyes, gross. Man, that’s tough!

  3. I have three broody hens - one of them has moved her nest a half dozen times, rolling into the new nest only the eggs she chooses to bring along. Currently, she is in the bathtub, a poor location but I needed to move her in case I could get her adopt chicks. Nope, she wanted nothing to do with them. She wasn’t aggressive, just distainful like I had a lot of nerve to even suggest it…shessh. Of course, it’s not as if she hasn’t been selective all along. What was I thinking?

  4. You have baby chicks and they are immeasurable tiny and frail. After a few days you get new baby chicks and suddenly the previously tiny chicks are huge. It’s hard to wrap your mind around how quickly these things grow and how tiny they are to start…

  5. I had a fifth nattering about birds but I just received a call that one of my co-workers was let go. Actually, the one that was the reason I accepted the job. He will land on his feet, if he hasn’t already, and do well. HUGE passion for photo shop, digital marketing and somewhat visionary in terms of the big picture. I’ll miss him. He has freelance clients already so I’m assuming that this will be a pretty easy transition for him and a plus for them.
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