Quickwitter



Sep 10

These underwater “crop circles” were showing up off the coast of Japan. No one could figure out what what making them - turns out that a Japanese species of puffer fish creates its own Sand Castle - pretty remarkable.

Jan 19

FISH TILE DESIGNConceptMosaic Panel©Laura Quick
In 2003 my friend Gail and I decided to open an online mosaic shop and I started creating artwork, this was one panel for a mural. I came across it while I was looking for a photo of my Mom earlier and was thinking about Gail. 
We never opened the business, the day before the launch her son was in a motorcycle accident in Mexico. He spent a couple of weeks in a coma, then 6 months in recovery and another 6 months in a halfway house for further recovery. Eventually, he recovered enough to return to high school and to go on to earn his AA in college. Gail and I grew apart over time, but I learned so much about life from her, about not panicking, and about love, and devotion and not giving up. She is an amazing woman.

FISH TILE DESIGN
ConceptMosaic Panel
©Laura Quick

In 2003 my friend Gail and I decided to open an online mosaic shop and I started creating artwork, this was one panel for a mural. I came across it while I was looking for a photo of my Mom earlier and was thinking about Gail. 

We never opened the business, the day before the launch her son was in a motorcycle accident in Mexico. He spent a couple of weeks in a coma, then 6 months in recovery and another 6 months in a halfway house for further recovery. Eventually, he recovered enough to return to high school and to go on to earn his AA in college. Gail and I grew apart over time, but I learned so much about life from her, about not panicking, and about love, and devotion and not giving up. She is an amazing woman.

Nov 13

KOI PONDSan Diego, California©Laura Quick
The common carp was aquacultured as a food fish at least as far back as the fifth century in China, and in the Roman Empire during the spread of Christianity in Europe. Common carp were bred for color in Japan in the 1820s, initially in the town of Ojiya in the Niigata prefecture on the northeastern coast of Honshu island. By the 20th century, a number of color patterns had been established, most notably the red-and-white Kohaku. The outside world was not aware of the development of color variations in koi until 1914, when the Niigata koi were exhibited in the annual exposition in Tokyo. At that point, interest in koi exploded throughout Japan. The hobby of keeping koi eventually spread worldwide. More

KOI POND
San Diego, California
©Laura Quick

The common carp was aquacultured as a food fish at least as far back as the fifth century in China, and in the Roman Empire during the spread of Christianity in Europe. Common carp were bred for color in Japan in the 1820s, initially in the town of Ojiya in the Niigata prefecture on the northeastern coast of Honshu island. By the 20th century, a number of color patterns had been established, most notably the red-and-white Kohaku. The outside world was not aware of the development of color variations in koi until 1914, when the Niigata koi were exhibited in the annual exposition in Tokyo. At that point, interest in koi exploded throughout Japan. The hobby of keeping koi eventually spread worldwide. More

Aug 27 Reblogged

Love this fish - the color and pattern are amazing, plus the lines by its eye are recall the tattoos of New Zealand natives and give it the name of Maori Wrasse. The enormous bulbous head it grows when it’s older gives it its alternate name of “Napolean” Wrasse.
animalworld:

MAORI WRASSE, Napoleon wrasse, or Napoleonfish;Cheilinus undulatus by Luc Viatour
This fish is chock full of win - the patterning is gorgeous (even better in the shot on the other posts link) males grow to SIX FEET in length and 300 pounds.
The humphead wrasse is a wrasse that is mainly found in coral reefs in the Indo-Pacific region. It is also known as the Māori wrasse, Napoleon wrasse, Napoleonfish; or “So Mei” 蘇眉 (Cantonese) and “Mameng” (Filipino).
The humphead wrasse is the largest living member of the family Labridae,  with males reaching 6 feet (2 m) in length, while females rarely exceed  about 3 feet (1 m). It has thick, fleshy lips and a hump that forms on  its head above the eyes, becoming more prominent as the fish ages. Males  range from a bright electric blue to green, a purplish blue, or a  relatively dull blue/green. Juveniles and females are red-orange above,  and red-orange to white below. Some males grow very large, with one  unconfirmed report of a Humphead Wrasse that was 7.75 feet (2.29 m) long  and weighed 420 lbs (190.5 kg).
Individuals become sexually mature at 5 to 7 years and females are known  to live for around 30 years whereas males live a slightly shorter 25  years. Humphead wrasse are protogynous hermaphrodites, with some members of the population becoming male at approximately 9 years old.  The factors that control the timing of sex change are not yet known.  Adults move to the down-current end of the reef and form local spawning  aggregations they concentrate to spawn at certain times of the year.
Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Humphead_wrasse
Other posts:
Maori Wrasse, another great shot
Titan Triggerfish
Ribbon Sweetlips

Love this fish - the color and pattern are amazing, plus the lines by its eye are recall the tattoos of New Zealand natives and give it the name of Maori Wrasse. The enormous bulbous head it grows when it’s older gives it its alternate name of “Napolean” Wrasse.

animalworld:

MAORI WRASSE, Napoleon wrasse, or Napoleonfish;
Cheilinus undulatus
by Luc Viatour

This fish is chock full of win - the patterning is gorgeous (even better in the shot on the other posts link) males grow to SIX FEET in length and 300 pounds.

The humphead wrasse is a wrasse that is mainly found in coral reefs in the Indo-Pacific region. It is also known as the Māori wrasse, Napoleon wrasse, Napoleonfish; or “So Mei” 蘇眉 (Cantonese) and “Mameng” (Filipino).

The humphead wrasse is the largest living member of the family Labridae, with males reaching 6 feet (2 m) in length, while females rarely exceed about 3 feet (1 m). It has thick, fleshy lips and a hump that forms on its head above the eyes, becoming more prominent as the fish ages. Males range from a bright electric blue to green, a purplish blue, or a relatively dull blue/green. Juveniles and females are red-orange above, and red-orange to white below. Some males grow very large, with one unconfirmed report of a Humphead Wrasse that was 7.75 feet (2.29 m) long and weighed 420 lbs (190.5 kg).

Individuals become sexually mature at 5 to 7 years and females are known to live for around 30 years whereas males live a slightly shorter 25 years. Humphead wrasse are protogynous hermaphrodites, with some members of the population becoming male at approximately 9 years old. The factors that control the timing of sex change are not yet known. Adults move to the down-current end of the reef and form local spawning aggregations they concentrate to spawn at certain times of the year.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Humphead_wrasse

Other posts:

Maori Wrasse, another great shot

Titan Triggerfish

Ribbon Sweetlips

Aug 12 Reblogged

Nature exhibits such grace
animalworld:

SILVERSIDESlikely Atherinomorus capricornensis©Jason Isley / SCUBAzooImages.com
This fabulous shot was taken in Wakatobi, Wangiwangi, Sulawesi Tenggara, Indonesia
Some marine silversides aggregate into enormous schools—numbering in the  thousands—which cruise just below the surface, continually feeding on  plankton. For instance, Atherinomorus capricornensis has been  observed forming schools more than 328 ft (100 m) long and 65.6 ft (20  m) wide. At night silversides are attracted to bright lights and are  caught easily by fishermen for use as bait. Some of the most interesting  types of behavior found in atheriniforms, however, relate to  reproduction.
In both male and femalesilversides , the anal and genital openings are shifted and  are located under the throat. Males have an elaborate,  asymmetric copulatory structure under the head, called a priapium, for  which no parallel exists among other fishes.
A suspensory component of  the priapium is made up of modified anterior pleural ribs and pelvic  bones. Emerging from the posterior end of the priapium and arching  forward almost the entire length of the head are the  ctenactinia—elongate, curved bones used for clasping the female during  mating.
Fact Source: http://www.jiffynotes.com/a_study_guides/book_notes/grze_05/grze_05_00297.html
Other photos you may like:
Garra Rufa - the pedicure fish
Dolphin feeding
Spinner Shark breaks the surface through a school of fish
—-
123zero:

(via Silversides under jetty by Jason Isley)

Nature exhibits such grace

animalworld:

SILVERSIDES
likely Atherinomorus capricornensis
©Jason Isley / SCUBAzooImages.com

This fabulous shot was taken in Wakatobi, Wangiwangi, Sulawesi Tenggara, Indonesia

Some marine silversides aggregate into enormous schools—numbering in the thousands—which cruise just below the surface, continually feeding on plankton. For instance, Atherinomorus capricornensis has been observed forming schools more than 328 ft (100 m) long and 65.6 ft (20 m) wide. At night silversides are attracted to bright lights and are caught easily by fishermen for use as bait. Some of the most interesting types of behavior found in atheriniforms, however, relate to reproduction.

In both male and femalesilversides , the anal and genital openings are shifted and are located under the throat. Males have an elaborate, asymmetric copulatory structure under the head, called a priapium, for which no parallel exists among other fishes.

A suspensory component of the priapium is made up of modified anterior pleural ribs and pelvic bones. Emerging from the posterior end of the priapium and arching forward almost the entire length of the head are the ctenactinia—elongate, curved bones used for clasping the female during mating.

Fact Source:
http://www.jiffynotes.com/a_study_guides/book_notes/grze_05/grze_05_00297.html

Other photos you may like:

Garra Rufa - the pedicure fish

Dolphin feeding

Spinner Shark breaks the surface through a school of fish

—-

123zero:

(via Silversides under jetty by Jason Isley)

Jan 01 Reblogged

RIBBON SWEETLIPS or Grunts  -   ©marika_treffert
Sweetlips are usually found either singly or in groups hovering over the  reef during the day. They are nocturnal predators feeding on fish and  benthic crustaceans. In some areas sweetlips are known as “Grunts” because they “grunt”, the  grunting sound is produced by their flat teeth plates rubbing together  and this is amplified by their air bladders. Sweetlips can be distinguished from other species by their very large rubbery lips
(via starcrossed1)

RIBBON SWEETLIPS or Grunts  -   ©marika_treffert

Sweetlips are usually found either singly or in groups hovering over the reef during the day. They are nocturnal predators feeding on fish and benthic crustaceans.
In some areas sweetlips are known as “Grunts” because they “grunt”, the grunting sound is produced by their flat teeth plates rubbing together and this is amplified by their air bladders. Sweetlips can be distinguished from other species by their very large rubbery lips

(via starcrossed1)

Aug 27 Reblogged

mrporkchop:

supersonicelectronic:

John Dyer Baizley.