Quickwitter



Aug 28 Reblogged

My favorite creepiest sea anemone EVER - works like a venue fly trap (hence the name) - BTW, in case its confusing - its big “foot” is attached to the thin stick…(also check out the Electric Flaming Scallop)
animalworld:

VENUS FLYTRAP SEA ANEMONE*Actinoscyphia aurelia©NOAA Photo Library
The Venus flytrap sea anemone is a large sea anemone resembling a Venus Flytrap. Like it’s plant namesake, it is believed to close its tentacles to capture prey or to protect itself. It is found in and around the Gulf of Mexico.
Flytrap anemones grow up to 30 cm (one foot) across attaching themselves to exposed rock  outcrops on seamounts and deep sea ridges, where currents are relatively  strong. Some scientists have suggested that flytrap anemones  eat bits of debris carried on the ocean currents, their body shape  suggests that they feed on small animals, such as shrimp, that happen to  swim by. Flytrap anemones were recently discovered to release bioluminescent slime when disturbed.
Source: http://www.mbari.org/news/feature-image/flytrap.htmlhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Venus_flytrap_sea_anemone
Other posts:
Venus Flytrap in action
Electric Flaming Scallop
TheTraveling Sea Anemone
Anemone and Pink Anemonefish
*Looks like the carniverous plant from the movie Little Shop of Horrors

My favorite creepiest sea anemone EVER - works like a venue fly trap (hence the name) - BTW, in case its confusing - its big “foot” is attached to the thin stick…(also check out the Electric Flaming Scallop)

animalworld:

VENUS FLYTRAP SEA ANEMONE*
Actinoscyphia aurelia
©NOAA Photo Library

The Venus flytrap sea anemone is a large sea anemone resembling a Venus Flytrap. Like it’s plant namesake, it is believed to close its tentacles to capture prey or to protect itself. It is found in and around the Gulf of Mexico.

Flytrap anemones grow up to 30 cm (one foot) across attaching themselves to exposed rock outcrops on seamounts and deep sea ridges, where currents are relatively strong. Some scientists have suggested that flytrap anemones eat bits of debris carried on the ocean currents, their body shape suggests that they feed on small animals, such as shrimp, that happen to swim by. Flytrap anemones were recently discovered to release bioluminescent slime when disturbed.

Source:
http://www.mbari.org/news/feature-image/flytrap.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Venus_flytrap_sea_anemone

Other posts:

Venus Flytrap in action

Electric Flaming Scallop

TheTraveling Sea Anemone

Anemone and Pink Anemonefish

*Looks like the carniverous plant from the movie Little Shop of Horrors

Aug 27 Reblogged

Love this fish - the color and pattern are amazing, plus the lines by its eye are recall the tattoos of New Zealand natives and give it the name of Maori Wrasse. The enormous bulbous head it grows when it’s older gives it its alternate name of “Napolean” Wrasse.
animalworld:

MAORI WRASSE, Napoleon wrasse, or Napoleonfish;Cheilinus undulatus by Luc Viatour
This fish is chock full of win - the patterning is gorgeous (even better in the shot on the other posts link) males grow to SIX FEET in length and 300 pounds.
The humphead wrasse is a wrasse that is mainly found in coral reefs in the Indo-Pacific region. It is also known as the Māori wrasse, Napoleon wrasse, Napoleonfish; or “So Mei” 蘇眉 (Cantonese) and “Mameng” (Filipino).
The humphead wrasse is the largest living member of the family Labridae,  with males reaching 6 feet (2 m) in length, while females rarely exceed  about 3 feet (1 m). It has thick, fleshy lips and a hump that forms on  its head above the eyes, becoming more prominent as the fish ages. Males  range from a bright electric blue to green, a purplish blue, or a  relatively dull blue/green. Juveniles and females are red-orange above,  and red-orange to white below. Some males grow very large, with one  unconfirmed report of a Humphead Wrasse that was 7.75 feet (2.29 m) long  and weighed 420 lbs (190.5 kg).
Individuals become sexually mature at 5 to 7 years and females are known  to live for around 30 years whereas males live a slightly shorter 25  years. Humphead wrasse are protogynous hermaphrodites, with some members of the population becoming male at approximately 9 years old.  The factors that control the timing of sex change are not yet known.  Adults move to the down-current end of the reef and form local spawning  aggregations they concentrate to spawn at certain times of the year.
Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Humphead_wrasse
Other posts:
Maori Wrasse, another great shot
Titan Triggerfish
Ribbon Sweetlips

Love this fish - the color and pattern are amazing, plus the lines by its eye are recall the tattoos of New Zealand natives and give it the name of Maori Wrasse. The enormous bulbous head it grows when it’s older gives it its alternate name of “Napolean” Wrasse.

animalworld:

MAORI WRASSE, Napoleon wrasse, or Napoleonfish;
Cheilinus undulatus
by Luc Viatour

This fish is chock full of win - the patterning is gorgeous (even better in the shot on the other posts link) males grow to SIX FEET in length and 300 pounds.

The humphead wrasse is a wrasse that is mainly found in coral reefs in the Indo-Pacific region. It is also known as the Māori wrasse, Napoleon wrasse, Napoleonfish; or “So Mei” 蘇眉 (Cantonese) and “Mameng” (Filipino).

The humphead wrasse is the largest living member of the family Labridae, with males reaching 6 feet (2 m) in length, while females rarely exceed about 3 feet (1 m). It has thick, fleshy lips and a hump that forms on its head above the eyes, becoming more prominent as the fish ages. Males range from a bright electric blue to green, a purplish blue, or a relatively dull blue/green. Juveniles and females are red-orange above, and red-orange to white below. Some males grow very large, with one unconfirmed report of a Humphead Wrasse that was 7.75 feet (2.29 m) long and weighed 420 lbs (190.5 kg).

Individuals become sexually mature at 5 to 7 years and females are known to live for around 30 years whereas males live a slightly shorter 25 years. Humphead wrasse are protogynous hermaphrodites, with some members of the population becoming male at approximately 9 years old. The factors that control the timing of sex change are not yet known. Adults move to the down-current end of the reef and form local spawning aggregations they concentrate to spawn at certain times of the year.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Humphead_wrasse

Other posts:

Maori Wrasse, another great shot

Titan Triggerfish

Ribbon Sweetlips

Aug 27 Reblogged

Mother Nature, you are such a show off!
animalworld:

AUSTRALIAN SPOTTED JELLYFISH or WHITE SPOTTED JELLYFISHPhyllorhiza punctata ©cheesekid
This gorgeous shot was taken at the Monterey Bay Aquarium 
Phyllorhiza punctata is a species of jellyfish, also known as the Australian spotted jellyfish or the White-spotted jellyfish.  It is native to the southwestern Pacific, where it feeds primarily on  zooplankton. P. punctata average 45-50 cm in bell diameter but there had  been a maximum reported size of 62 cm. However, in October, 2007, one  72 cm. wide, perhaps the largest ever recorded, was found on Sunset  Beach, NC. In July 2007 smaller ones were seen in Bogue Sound much  further north along the North Carolina Coast. They have only a mild  venom and are not considered a threat to humans. However, their ability  to consume plankton and the eggs and larvae of important fish species is  cause for concern. Each jellyfish can filter as much as 13,200 gallons  of sea water per day. While doing that, it ingests the plankton that  native species need.
True jellyfish, Phylum Cnidaria, go through a two stage life cycle which  consists of a medusa stage (adult) and a polyp stage (juvenile). In the  medusa stage male jellyfish release sperm into the water column and the  female jellyfish gathers the sperm into her mouth where she holds the  eggs. Once fertilization occurs and larvae are formed they leave their  mother and settle to the ocean floor. Once on the bottom a polyp form  occurs and this form reproduces asexually by “cloning” or dividing  itself into other polyps. Jellyfish can live for up to five years in the  polyp stage and up to two years in the medusa stage.
Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phyllorhiza_punctata
Other posts:
Purple Striped Jelly
Blue Button
Blood-Red Jelly

Mother Nature, you are such a show off!

animalworld:

AUSTRALIAN SPOTTED JELLYFISH or WHITE SPOTTED JELLYFISH
Phyllorhiza punctata
 ©cheesekid

This gorgeous shot was taken at the Monterey Bay Aquarium

Phyllorhiza punctata is a species of jellyfish, also known as the Australian spotted jellyfish or the White-spotted jellyfish. It is native to the southwestern Pacific, where it feeds primarily on zooplankton. P. punctata average 45-50 cm in bell diameter but there had been a maximum reported size of 62 cm. However, in October, 2007, one 72 cm. wide, perhaps the largest ever recorded, was found on Sunset Beach, NC. In July 2007 smaller ones were seen in Bogue Sound much further north along the North Carolina Coast. They have only a mild venom and are not considered a threat to humans. However, their ability to consume plankton and the eggs and larvae of important fish species is cause for concern. Each jellyfish can filter as much as 13,200 gallons of sea water per day. While doing that, it ingests the plankton that native species need.

True jellyfish, Phylum Cnidaria, go through a two stage life cycle which consists of a medusa stage (adult) and a polyp stage (juvenile). In the medusa stage male jellyfish release sperm into the water column and the female jellyfish gathers the sperm into her mouth where she holds the eggs. Once fertilization occurs and larvae are formed they leave their mother and settle to the ocean floor. Once on the bottom a polyp form occurs and this form reproduces asexually by “cloning” or dividing itself into other polyps. Jellyfish can live for up to five years in the polyp stage and up to two years in the medusa stage.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phyllorhiza_punctata

Other posts:

Purple Striped Jelly

Blue Button

Blood-Red Jelly

Aug 15 Reblogged

Wouldn’t you think that an animal that lives within a poisonous environment (such as Man-of-War fish living within the tentacles of the Portuguese Man-o-War) would develop a better system to avoid being stung than being “agile and extra bendy?”
animalworld:

PORTUGUESE MAN OF WAR & MAN OF WAR FISHPhysalia physalis & Nomeus gronovii© Seth Patterson
The Portuguese Man o’ War is not  one animal, but is actually comprised of colonies of invertebrate, jelly-like marine animals of the family: Physaliidae glomming together. These pelagic  hydroids (or hydrozoans) colonize and are infamous for their very painful, powerful sting.
It would seem wise for marine life to steer clear of the Man of War’s stinging tentacles however it shares an interdependence with a  variety of transient marine fish, including shepherd fish, clownfish, yellow  jack and one fish specialized to live within its tentacles—the man of war fish. 
The man-of-war fish is generally found in open sea or close to the Portuguese man of war, after which it is named. It is found in all tropical and subtropical oceans.
The fish is striped with blackish-blue blemishes covering its body, and the caudal fin is extremely forked. It grows to a length is up to 15.5 inches (39 cm).
As unlikely as it seems, this fish, rather than using  mucus (like the clownfish) to prevent stings, appears to uses highly agile swimming to  physically avoid tentacles. The fish has a very high number of vertebrate (41), which adds to its agility and uses its pectoral fins for swimming — a feature common in  fish  who specialize in maneuvering in tight spaces. It also has a  complex skin  design containing at least one antigen to the man-of-war’s  stinging toxin. The fish seems to be ten times more resistant to the toxin  than other fish.
Fact Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Man-of-war_fish
Other photos:
Portuguese Man of War
Blue Button
Flower Hat Jellyfish

Wouldn’t you think that an animal that lives within a poisonous environment (such as Man-of-War fish living within the tentacles of the Portuguese Man-o-War) would develop a better system to avoid being stung than being “agile and extra bendy?”

animalworld:

PORTUGUESE MAN OF WAR & MAN OF WAR FISH
Physalia physalis & Nomeus gronovii
© Seth Patterson

The Portuguese Man o’ War is not one animal, but is actually comprised of colonies of invertebrate, jelly-like marine animals of the family: Physaliidae glomming together. These pelagic  hydroids (or hydrozoans) colonize and are infamous for their very painful, powerful sting.

It would seem wise for marine life to steer clear of the Man of War’s stinging tentacles however it shares an interdependence with a variety of transient marine fish, including shepherd fish, clownfish, yellow jack and one fish specialized to live within its tentacles—the man of war fish

The man-of-war fish is generally found in open sea or close to the Portuguese man of war, after which it is named. It is found in all tropical and subtropical oceans.

The fish is striped with blackish-blue blemishes covering its body, and the caudal fin is extremely forked. It grows to a length is up to 15.5 inches (39 cm).

As unlikely as it seems, this fish, rather than using mucus (like the clownfish) to prevent stings, appears to uses highly agile swimming to physically avoid tentacles. The fish has a very high number of vertebrate (41), which adds to its agility and uses its pectoral fins for swimming — a feature common in fish who specialize in maneuvering in tight spaces. It also has a complex skin design containing at least one antigen to the man-of-war’s stinging toxin. The fish seems to be ten times more resistant to the toxin than other fish.

Fact Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Man-of-war_fish

Other photos:

Portuguese Man of War

Blue Button

Flower Hat Jellyfish

Jan 01 Reblogged

DOLPHIN Barcelona Zoo  -  © vdorse
(via starcrossed1)

DOLPHIN Barcelona Zoo  -  © vdorse

(via starcrossed1)

Jan 01 Reblogged

RIBBON SWEETLIPS or Grunts  -   ©marika_treffert
Sweetlips are usually found either singly or in groups hovering over the  reef during the day. They are nocturnal predators feeding on fish and  benthic crustaceans. In some areas sweetlips are known as “Grunts” because they “grunt”, the  grunting sound is produced by their flat teeth plates rubbing together  and this is amplified by their air bladders. Sweetlips can be distinguished from other species by their very large rubbery lips
(via starcrossed1)

RIBBON SWEETLIPS or Grunts  -   ©marika_treffert

Sweetlips are usually found either singly or in groups hovering over the reef during the day. They are nocturnal predators feeding on fish and benthic crustaceans.
In some areas sweetlips are known as “Grunts” because they “grunt”, the grunting sound is produced by their flat teeth plates rubbing together and this is amplified by their air bladders. Sweetlips can be distinguished from other species by their very large rubbery lips

(via starcrossed1)