Quickwitter



Apr 06

BLUE COCHIN HEN & CHICKS

This Blue Cochin is one of my favorite birds. Named Bonsai in honor of my friend Al (an avid gardener), they share the same birthday. She was a tidy broody mama and did me a favor by rolling the eggs out of the nest and piling them up by the door for easy removal as she decided to let them go. So far, she’s been great with the 4 babies she hatched out — a Blue Cochin, a Delaware, a Salmon Faverolles, and a Leghorn/Brahma cross.

TOP PHOTO: The mama hen will call the chicks over and pick up food for them then drop it for the babies to eat. In the top shot you can see the grain dropping (by the white chick’s foot)

BOTTOM PHOTO: In the lower shot the hen is digging with her foot, and the orange chick now has the grain in her mouth.The two closest chicks to the ground probably have their eyes closed given the amount of dust Mama’s foot will churn up.

The gray chick facing away is another blue Cochin, I am super-excited that the Mama’s genes came through on that one, the rooster is a Buff Brahma.

Mar 29

naimhe, Oh I was PLENTY pissed off and went the canyon FB page to let people know. Everyone jumped on board and was up in arms. It will be an issue at the next community meeting. These are many of my egg customers btw. We live in an oak forest, there is very little that grows in the shade of live oaks, and maybe a strip 6’ wide by 25’ long that could be left to grow or taken out with a weed whacker, shovel, etc. This is a sandstone canyon so removing plants is super easy. Keeping predators from digging under a fence however, nearly impossible. Even electrified.

Mar 28

MEANWHILE BACK AT THE FARM…
The top green egg is your basic extra large egg, the smaller is a new laying hen egg - a Salmon Faverolles hen, and the ginormous egg is a double yolker, and one of the biggest I’ve seen. All three eggs were laid in the same nest today.

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MEANWHILE BACK AT THE FARM…

The top green egg is your basic extra large egg, the smaller is a new laying hen egg - a Salmon Faverolles hen, and the ginormous egg is a double yolker, and one of the biggest I’ve seen. All three eggs were laid in the same nest today.

Mar 14

DARK BRAHMA ROO
This tiny rooster realized that he could crow this morning. This was taken just after he crowed for the first time. I like that he looks a little puzzled. He’s still warming up his vocal cords, but now from the safe distance of the greenhouse. Youngest rooster to crow that I’ve ever had. And Brahmas tend to mature slowly. Yikes, lol.

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DARK BRAHMA ROO

This tiny rooster realized that he could crow this morning. This was taken just after he crowed for the first time. I like that he looks a little puzzled. He’s still warming up his vocal cords, but now from the safe distance of the greenhouse. Youngest rooster to crow that I’ve ever had. And Brahmas tend to mature slowly. Yikes, lol.

Mar 14

Five for Friday - Chick Edition

  1. Chicks - I’m knee deep in ‘em
    65 replacement arrives this AM
    30 hatched out for a friend
    3 broody hens on at least a dozen each (1 on 30)
    36 eggs in the incubator set to hatch this weekend (i hear cheeping!)

  2. One of the groups of chicks I brought in carried Mycoplasma Gallisepticum, it may have been from the hatchery, or from one of three farms I’m in contact with. It spread through my flock like crazy. Most likely I was the carrier from pen to pen. I’ve treated everyone large and small, and hope that’s the end of it. Birds dying, getting infected eyes, gross. Man, that’s tough!

  3. I have three broody hens - one of them has moved her nest a half dozen times, rolling into the new nest only the eggs she chooses to bring along. Currently, she is in the bathtub, a poor location but I needed to move her in case I could get her adopt chicks. Nope, she wanted nothing to do with them. She wasn’t aggressive, just distainful like I had a lot of nerve to even suggest it…shessh. Of course, it’s not as if she hasn’t been selective all along. What was I thinking?

  4. You have baby chicks and they are immeasurable tiny and frail. After a few days you get new baby chicks and suddenly the previously tiny chicks are huge. It’s hard to wrap your mind around how quickly these things grow and how tiny they are to start…

  5. I had a fifth nattering about birds but I just received a call that one of my co-workers was let go. Actually, the one that was the reason I accepted the job. He will land on his feet, if he hasn’t already, and do well. HUGE passion for photo shop, digital marketing and somewhat visionary in terms of the big picture. I’ll miss him. He has freelance clients already so I’m assuming that this will be a pretty easy transition for him and a plus for them.

Feb 17

APPENZELLER SPITZHAUBEN - or Silver Spangled Spitzhauben (©Poultrysite.com)

Among my favorite of the new chicks is the Appenzeller Spitzhauben — a breed of chicken originating in Appenzell region of Switzerland. The Appenzeller comes in two varieties. Mine are the Spitzhauben, meaning “pointed hood” (which comes from the frilly hat worn by the women in the Appenzeller region in Switzerland.

Brought to America by a doctor who successfully introduced the breed. It has a V-comb and feather crests in both hens and roosters. The bird is either white (mine) or gold and come with black spangling — so they are also called Gold / Silver Spangled Spitzhaubens.

Today the breed is largely an ornamental one kept primarily for showing, but they also lay a respectable quantity of white eggs. This is a light chicken, with hens weighing an average of 3.5 lbs (1.6 kg) and roosters 4.5 lbs (2 kg). Behaviorally, it is a flighty breed that doesn’t do well in confinement, can forage well, and will roost in trees if given the opportunity. In North America, it is very rare breed and is recognized officially by neither the American Poultry Association or other breed registries. The silver spangled Spitzhauben [shown] is the most common variety found abroad.

Though there is no standard in North America, the UK does recognize the breed and accepts it as a standardized breed. There is, however, a push in the United States for the Spitzhauben to be recognized by the American Poultry Association.

Jan 31

My egg delivery earlier this weekThe bakery that buys my eggs took a photo of them and posted the picture on Facebook. These are 5 flats of 30 eggs each. I’ll do another drop off this weekend.Sometimes it’s important to remember the reason for your madness. 
For scottswords

My egg delivery earlier this week
The bakery that buys my eggs took a photo of them and posted the picture on Facebook. These are 5 flats of 30 eggs each. I’ll do another drop off this weekend.Sometimes it’s important to remember the reason for your madness.

For scottswords

Jan 26

I’ve moved my chicken drivel

You’ll still see some I’m sure, but I moved the bulk here:

http://teenytinydinosaurfarm.tumblr.com/

Jan 16

For discodroid,  I found you the perfect Canadian chicken for your upcoming flock…
The Partridge Chantecler
Why?It’s A CANADIAN originalBred to be winter-hardyComes in two colors - white & partridge
There’s Scandel in it’s heritage: (which makes keeping the breed more fun)The “Partridge Chantecler” is actually unrelated to the original Chantecler.  “The Partridge Chantecler was developed by Dr. J. E. Wilkinson around the same time. When this bird was submitted for inclusion to the American Poultry Association in 1935, it was erroneously placed with the Chantecler chicken (thought to be a variety, not a separate breed). This, ended up causing the demise of another distinct breed of Canadian chicken. The proper name for the Partridge Chantecler should have been the “Albertan” - but it is not… (source)
So, sour grapes in Alberta…
It’s the ONLY breed of chicken in the world known to have been created [primarily] by a monkAt the dawn of the 20th century, no breeds of chicken had been established in Canada. Canadian farmers only had fowl of European and American derivation. This fact was noted by Brother Wilfred Chantelain, a Trappist monk and Doctor of Agronomy, as he toured the poultry flocks of the Oka Agricultural Institute, an agricultural school at his abbey which is affiliated with the Université de Montréal.
In 1907, the Brother set out to remedy this void. He create a practical chicken suited to Canada’s climate and production needs. He created the White variant of the Chantecler. It was admitted into the American Poultry Association’s Standard of Perfection in 1921. To this day, the Chantecler is one of only two breeds of poultry from Canada, and the only one known to have been created primarily by a member of a monastic order.
—-
Also, handy as a dual meat/egg bird in case of society collapse, or zombie apocalypse.
I ordered the Partridge variety — because partridge markings are awesome. Given that it’s suited for extreme cold, and we don’t have that in Los Angeles, I’m going to install a chicken door in the deep freeze so they can amble in and cool down during the summertime…what, you didn’t think I was going to EAT them?!! Sheesh, it’s like you don’t know me at all. :)

For discodroid,  I found you the perfect Canadian chicken for your upcoming flock…

The Partridge Chantecler

Why?
It’s A CANADIAN original
Bred to be winter-hardy
Comes in two colors - white & partridge

There’s Scandel in it’s heritage:
(which makes keeping the breed more fun)
The “Partridge Chantecler” is actually unrelated to the original Chantecler.  “The Partridge Chantecler was developed by Dr. J. E. Wilkinson around the same time. When this bird was submitted for inclusion to the American Poultry Association in 1935, it was erroneously placed with the Chantecler chicken (thought to be a variety, not a separate breed). This, ended up causing the demise of another distinct breed of Canadian chicken. The proper name for the Partridge Chantecler should have been the “Albertan” - but it is not… (source)

So, sour grapes in Alberta…

It’s the ONLY breed of chicken in the world known to have been created [primarily] by a monk
At the dawn of the 20th century, no breeds of chicken had been established in Canada. Canadian farmers only had fowl of European and American derivation. This fact was noted by Brother Wilfred Chantelain, a Trappist monk and Doctor of Agronomy, as he toured the poultry flocks of the Oka Agricultural Institute, an agricultural school at his abbey which is affiliated with the Université de Montréal.

In 1907, the Brother set out to remedy this void. He create a practical chicken suited to Canada’s climate and production needs. He created the White variant of the Chantecler. It was admitted into the American Poultry Association’s Standard of Perfection in 1921. To this day, the Chantecler is one of only two breeds of poultry from Canada, and the only one known to have been created primarily by a member of a monastic order.

—-

Also, handy as a dual meat/egg bird in case of society collapse, or zombie apocalypse.

I ordered the Partridge variety — because partridge markings are awesome. Given that it’s suited for extreme cold, and we don’t have that in Los Angeles, I’m going to install a chicken door in the deep freeze so they can amble in and cool down during the summertime…what, you didn’t think I was going to EAT them?!! Sheesh, it’s like you don’t know me at all. :)

Jan 09

DOUBLE LACED BARNEVELDER HEN & ROO

This are quick becoming one of my favorite breeds. They are friendly birds with beautiful feathering. I love the iridescence off the black in their feathers. The top is a young rooster (he’s even prettier now), and the bottom is a pullet, both at about 24 weeks.

The Barnevelder is a medium heavy dual breed (meat/egg) chicken named after the Dutch town of Barneveld. Between c. 1850 and 1875 many breeds were arriving in the West from Asia and being crossed with each other and with local chickens to create new/better breeds. One of the meat breeds was a black bird that was crossed with Brahmas, then Langshen, then Golden Wyandottes eventually breeding true and producing the Barnevelder.

The Barnevelder today is known for laying dark brown eggs — though mine lay dark enough eggs, they are not nearly as dark as a Maran’s chocolate-brown eggs.

The trade-off though is that these birds are beautiful.

Dec 17

TT - #3 PORCELAIN D’UCCLE (Duh-Clay) hen
A few weeks ago Bella and I visited a farm about an hour up the road, where she met other dogs that look just like her, and I picked up some chicks. This is one the farmers threw in, as I just love her coloring and the fan of feathers on her feet. I didn’t want bantams, in fact I met these folks and traded my bantams for their fancy breeds, but as it turns out, I’m a color and pattern hen hoarder - is that a thing?
I am hoping that she will breed with a larger rooster (which is ALL of the current roosters) and that her color will crop up in standard sized birds. Cuz little eggs, who needs em? :)

TT - #3 PORCELAIN D’UCCLE (Duh-Clay) hen

A few weeks ago Bella and I visited a farm about an hour up the road, where she met other dogs that look just like her, and I picked up some chicks. This is one the farmers threw in, as I just love her coloring and the fan of feathers on her feet. I didn’t want bantams, in fact I met these folks and traded my bantams for their fancy breeds, but as it turns out, I’m a color and pattern hen hoarder - is that a thing?

I am hoping that she will breed with a larger rooster (which is ALL of the current roosters) and that her color will crop up in standard sized birds. Cuz little eggs, who needs em? :)

Dec 17

TT - #2 AMERACAUNA Chicks
These are the chicks that have been keeping me up nights. The black one on the left (a roo?) has been the main culprit. Holy Cannoli can he chirp loud for hours on end?!! Like nails on a chalkboard to my ears.
I got these little ones from a farm in Acton, they will be one week old tomorrow. The woman who hatched them only raises pure-bred Ameracaunas Blue/Black/White/Splash and Wheaten Ameracaunas — as well as Argentine Dogos (a South American Mastiff breed). The woman was nice enough, but she was peculiar in being very precise with her movements. Maybe there’s something to that as my God, these are the calmest chicks (except the shrieking episode) that I’ve ever had.
I hope these chicks grow up to be as beautiful as their parents.
The darker birds will likely end up solid black, the grey chicks may be blue or slate, or gray with splashes of black. Should be interesting.

TT - #2 AMERACAUNA Chicks

These are the chicks that have been keeping me up nights. The black one on the left (a roo?) has been the main culprit. Holy Cannoli can he chirp loud for hours on end?!! Like nails on a chalkboard to my ears.

I got these little ones from a farm in Acton, they will be one week old tomorrow. The woman who hatched them only raises pure-bred Ameracaunas Blue/Black/White/Splash and Wheaten Ameracaunas — as well as Argentine Dogos (a South American Mastiff breed). The woman was nice enough, but she was peculiar in being very precise with her movements. Maybe there’s something to that as my God, these are the calmest chicks (except the shrieking episode) that I’ve ever had.

I hope these chicks grow up to be as beautiful as their parents.

The darker birds will likely end up solid black, the grey chicks may be blue or slate, or gray with splashes of black. Should be interesting.

Dec 07

I ran across a recipe to make cookies - for chickens

Here are the ingredients:

¼ cup Elmer’s glue
1 cup applesauce
1 cup ground cinnamon
Source 
Why the hell would I want to give any animal Elmer’s glue?
Especially an animal that can eat all of the regular ingredients in cookies…
Oh wait, they are cookies to decorate the chicken coop…
Nope, I don’t get it
Now I want to make edible and healthy cookies for the birds though

Nov 24

This is how big a Barnevelder hen can puff up when she wants to. Normally she’s the thinner than the Ameracauna hen on the left.
Seven for Sunday - Bird Edition
I was invited to a 3 year olds Birthday Party a Lollapalooza & Pizza thing, but I passed and instead hired Francisco and Luise to build another chicken pen. It need it. It’s dark out there now and they are still at it, putting corrugated sheet metal on the roof to keep the interior dry-er when it rains. Nice guys, hard workers.
We made a Home Depot run and stopped at a local Taco truck for dinner - YUM! The place was packed with people. Took us 45 minutes to get our food, but it was worth the wait. In the down time Francisco piled up a tom of to-go salsa containers, to spice up his food…fill his fridge?
I was the only gringo, so everyone spoke to me in Spanish. It was a chatty group. I know Spanish words but have no idea how to put them into a sentence. So I come across as a dim bulb. 
The guys I hire to work for me always want to know why I don’t have children. They are very persistent in wanting to know this…It’s a hard question to answer… :)
I got a bunch of multi-age chicks at the beginning of the month and it’s been a fiasco, 2 chicks died immediately, one has disappeared…no idea where it went. The folks that traded for my bantams, just emailed that they want me to swing by with a couple of chicks to replace the ones that died (no cost). How sweet is that? Nice folks, seriously.
I’m terrified to leave for the weekend. Yesterday, both dogs got out, a slew of chickens too, and one bird was stuck and had to be rescued. I have someone staying here but he doesn’t pay much attention to things.
My Craigslist friend Rubik, should have eggs hatching this weekend. A couple of dozen eggs this time are mine. I’m curious to see if his wonky incubator works. It is made of a pool noodle and a dorm sized fridge. He’s an engineer so it might be fine.

This is how big a Barnevelder hen can puff up when she wants to. Normally she’s the thinner than the Ameracauna hen on the left.

Seven for Sunday - Bird Edition

  1. I was invited to a 3 year olds Birthday Party a Lollapalooza & Pizza thing, but I passed and instead hired Francisco and Luise to build another chicken pen. It need it. It’s dark out there now and they are still at it, putting corrugated sheet metal on the roof to keep the interior dry-er when it rains. Nice guys, hard workers.
  2. We made a Home Depot run and stopped at a local Taco truck for dinner - YUM! The place was packed with people. Took us 45 minutes to get our food, but it was worth the wait. In the down time Francisco piled up a tom of to-go salsa containers, to spice up his food…fill his fridge?

  3. I was the only gringo, so everyone spoke to me in Spanish. It was a chatty group. I know Spanish words but have no idea how to put them into a sentence. So I come across as a dim bulb.
  4. The guys I hire to work for me always want to know why I don’t have children. They are very persistent in wanting to know this…It’s a hard question to answer… :)
  5. I got a bunch of multi-age chicks at the beginning of the month and it’s been a fiasco, 2 chicks died immediately, one has disappeared…no idea where it went. The folks that traded for my bantams, just emailed that they want me to swing by with a couple of chicks to replace the ones that died (no cost). How sweet is that? Nice folks, seriously.
  6. I’m terrified to leave for the weekend. Yesterday, both dogs got out, a slew of chickens too, and one bird was stuck and had to be rescued. I have someone staying here but he doesn’t pay much attention to things.
  7. My Craigslist friend Rubik, should have eggs hatching this weekend. A couple of dozen eggs this time are mine. I’m curious to see if his wonky incubator works. It is made of a pool noodle and a dorm sized fridge. He’s an engineer so it might be fine.

Nov 11

BEST CHICKEN COOP, EVER! 

Only $3,000 on Cragslist in Belchertown, MA. Christmas is coming…anyone? I’m sure they’d throw in free shipping to California, right?!

Of course it’s nicer than my house, so there is that. Still…

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