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DRAGONBrown Paper Bag Mask 1965by My Dad When I was in kindergarten we were assigned to make a paper bag mask for some parade that was taking place. Flummoxed, I took home my bag and my Dad and I talked about ideas. Then he got all excited about the project and created the dragon pictured while I watched (It has held up remarkably well for nearly 50 years). The dragon’s tongue was forked but there’s currently manila envelope stuck to the paint.
I loved it then, I still do. His ability to create something out of nothing was magic to me. 
He was totally busted however by the teacher for “doing the project himself instead of encouraging me to do the project.” She didn’t believe for a second that a 5 year old had anything to do with the graphics — even though I insisted that I helped. :)
Still, I wore it proudly in the parade. My eyes looked through the nostrils, maybe just a little haughty at all of the other kids that had baby drawings on their bags. :) 
I haven’t seen it since, and assumed that it had been trashed years and years ago. I love that my Mom saved it, I think she like to remember that he got busted.
I’m going to frame it and hang it in my studio.
Zoom Info
Camera
Canon EOS REBEL T5i
ISO
400
Aperture
f/5.6
Exposure
1/60th
Focal Length
55mm

DRAGON
Brown Paper Bag Mask 1965
by My Dad


When I was in kindergarten we were assigned to make a paper bag mask for some parade that was taking place. Flummoxed, I took home my bag and my Dad and I talked about ideas. Then he got all excited about the project and created the dragon pictured while I watched (It has held up remarkably well for nearly 50 years).
The dragon’s tongue was forked but there’s currently manila envelope stuck to the paint.

I loved it then, I still do. His ability to create something out of nothing was magic to me.

He was totally busted however by the teacher for “doing the project himself instead of encouraging me to do the project.” She didn’t believe for a second that a 5 year old had anything to do with the graphics — even though I insisted that I helped. :)

Still, I wore it proudly in the parade. My eyes looked through the nostrils, maybe just a little haughty at all of the other kids that had baby drawings on their bags. :)

I haven’t seen it since, and assumed that it had been trashed years and years ago. I love that my Mom saved it, I think she like to remember that he got busted.

I’m going to frame it and hang it in my studio.

Jon’s HouseSan Jose, CA©Laura Quick
Both Jon and I have traveled and have brought back art pieces from our various trips. Our interests are a bit different, I have a lot less Dia de los Muertos and religious iconography. Oddly though, over the years our houses have come to look more and more alike, in fact the most alike of anyone else that I know.
The main difference is that he has a LOT of stuff on display, and art he has commissioned on the walls, while I don’t tend to, but I do love the pieces he has.
I think as a priest, and now an only child, that he should pass them all along to me when he dies, right?*
*Don’t worry, he’ll outlive me, he’s a total health junkie.
Zoom Info
Jon’s HouseSan Jose, CA©Laura Quick
Both Jon and I have traveled and have brought back art pieces from our various trips. Our interests are a bit different, I have a lot less Dia de los Muertos and religious iconography. Oddly though, over the years our houses have come to look more and more alike, in fact the most alike of anyone else that I know.
The main difference is that he has a LOT of stuff on display, and art he has commissioned on the walls, while I don’t tend to, but I do love the pieces he has.
I think as a priest, and now an only child, that he should pass them all along to me when he dies, right?*
*Don’t worry, he’ll outlive me, he’s a total health junkie.
Zoom Info
Jon’s HouseSan Jose, CA©Laura Quick
Both Jon and I have traveled and have brought back art pieces from our various trips. Our interests are a bit different, I have a lot less Dia de los Muertos and religious iconography. Oddly though, over the years our houses have come to look more and more alike, in fact the most alike of anyone else that I know.
The main difference is that he has a LOT of stuff on display, and art he has commissioned on the walls, while I don’t tend to, but I do love the pieces he has.
I think as a priest, and now an only child, that he should pass them all along to me when he dies, right?*
*Don’t worry, he’ll outlive me, he’s a total health junkie.
Zoom Info
Jon’s HouseSan Jose, CA©Laura Quick
Both Jon and I have traveled and have brought back art pieces from our various trips. Our interests are a bit different, I have a lot less Dia de los Muertos and religious iconography. Oddly though, over the years our houses have come to look more and more alike, in fact the most alike of anyone else that I know.
The main difference is that he has a LOT of stuff on display, and art he has commissioned on the walls, while I don’t tend to, but I do love the pieces he has.
I think as a priest, and now an only child, that he should pass them all along to me when he dies, right?*
*Don’t worry, he’ll outlive me, he’s a total health junkie.
Zoom Info

Jon’s House
San Jose, CA
©Laura Quick

Both Jon and I have traveled and have brought back art pieces from our various trips. Our interests are a bit different, I have a lot less Dia de los Muertos and religious iconography. Oddly though, over the years our houses have come to look more and more alike, in fact the most alike of anyone else that I know.

The main difference is that he has a LOT of stuff on display, and art he has commissioned on the walls, while I don’t tend to, but I do love the pieces he has.

I think as a priest, and now an only child, that he should pass them all along to me when he dies, right?*

*Don’t worry, he’ll outlive me, he’s a total health junkie.

FISH TILE DESIGN
ConceptMosaic Panel
©Laura Quick

In 2003 my friend Gail and I decided to open an online mosaic shop and I started creating artwork, this was one panel for a mural. I came across it while I was looking for a photo of my Mom earlier and was thinking about Gail. 

We never opened the business, the day before the launch her son was in a motorcycle accident in Mexico. He spent a couple of weeks in a coma, then 6 months in recovery and another 6 months in a halfway house for further recovery. Eventually, he recovered enough to return to high school and to go on to earn his AA in college. Gail and I grew apart over time, but I learned so much about life from her, about not panicking, and about love, and devotion and not giving up. She is an amazing woman.

©beili liu — WTF, seriously?
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Beili Liu.
Imagine walking into a silent room where a woman is mending. Now imagine that she’s sitting underneath 1,500 pairs of sharp Chinese scissors that are suspended from the ceiling, precariously pointed downwards. This was the idea behind The Mending Project by Beili Liu. http://www.beililiu.com/index.html
Zoom Info
Camera
Canon EOS DIGITAL REBEL XS
ISO
400
Aperture
f/3.5
Exposure
1/25th
Focal Length
18mm

©beili liu — WTF, seriously?

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Beili Liu.

Imagine walking into a silent room where a woman is mending. Now imagine that she’s sitting underneath 1,500 pairs of sharp Chinese scissors that are suspended from the ceiling, precariously pointed downwards. This was the idea behind The Mending Project by Beili Liu.

http://www.beililiu.com/index.html

Absolutely fabulous use of losing lottery tickets and romance novel covers. kudos to ghostofadream.com :)

miss-mary-quite-contrary:

Friend of Unconsumption Yellow Owl Workshop (previous mention here) hipped us to this artwork made from thousands of discarded lottery tickets.

To make the large-scale collages, the New York-based artist collaborative known as Ghost of a Dream, a.k.a. Lauren Was and Adam Eckstrom, uses scratch-off tickets found on sidewalks and corner shops, among other places, and romance novel covers collected from thrift stores and sellers on Craigslist. 

From Davidson Contemporary:

The artist collaborative Ghost of a Dream works with sculpture and installation to embody the essence of opulence, through construction of materials that typically end up in the trash. They mine popular culture for detritus that people use to attain their goals. Whether it is a romance novel someone reads to transport them into a dream reality, a religious tract promising the glory of eternal life, or a lottery ticket that gives the possibility of a future full of decadence, Ghost of a Dream uses these remnants to re- create peoples hopes and aspirations.

Pictured: Detail of Dream Home (2009); the installation’s materials include $70,000 worth of lottery tickets. Photo via Ghost of a Dream.

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