Quickwitter



Mar 14

DARK BRAHMA ROO
This tiny rooster realized that he could crow this morning. This was taken just after he crowed for the first time. I like that he looks a little puzzled. He’s still warming up his vocal cords, but now from the safe distance of the greenhouse. Youngest rooster to crow that I’ve ever had. And Brahmas tend to mature slowly. Yikes, lol.

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DARK BRAHMA ROO

This tiny rooster realized that he could crow this morning. This was taken just after he crowed for the first time. I like that he looks a little puzzled. He’s still warming up his vocal cords, but now from the safe distance of the greenhouse. Youngest rooster to crow that I’ve ever had. And Brahmas tend to mature slowly. Yikes, lol.

Jan 09

DOUBLE LACED BARNEVELDER HEN & ROO

This are quick becoming one of my favorite breeds. They are friendly birds with beautiful feathering. I love the iridescence off the black in their feathers. The top is a young rooster (he’s even prettier now), and the bottom is a pullet, both at about 24 weeks.

The Barnevelder is a medium heavy dual breed (meat/egg) chicken named after the Dutch town of Barneveld. Between c. 1850 and 1875 many breeds were arriving in the West from Asia and being crossed with each other and with local chickens to create new/better breeds. One of the meat breeds was a black bird that was crossed with Brahmas, then Langshen, then Golden Wyandottes eventually breeding true and producing the Barnevelder.

The Barnevelder today is known for laying dark brown eggs — though mine lay dark enough eggs, they are not nearly as dark as a Maran’s chocolate-brown eggs.

The trade-off though is that these birds are beautiful.

Nov 14

A Possible Doukey?
VasolineJesus was looking for a Halloween kid deterrent…and all this time I have had the answer in my yard. This Nankin rooster I call him Jackass, but we can change his name to Doukey…he’s the smallest natural breed of chicken so about a pound of trouble, and S-H-R-I-L-L, Shit Howdy can he screech. I have two of them, so they can come as a matched set or individually. Even the Nankin hens avoid them.

A Possible Doukey?

VasolineJesus was looking for a Halloween kid deterrent…and all this time I have had the answer in my yard. This Nankin rooster I call him Jackass, but we can change his name to Doukey…he’s the smallest natural breed of chicken so about a pound of trouble, and S-H-R-I-L-L, Shit Howdy can he screech. I have two of them, so they can come as a matched set or individually. Even the Nankin hens avoid them.

Nov 09

Scowling Rooster is Scowly
Lol, this is the happy face of my Brahma Rooster “Big Red” after I rescued him. He’d gotten himself wedged between the back of the pen and the wall — took me two hours to get him free and required real tools. Despite his cross look, he’s the gentlest rooster I have.

Scowling Rooster is Scowly

Lol, this is the happy face of my Brahma Rooster “Big Red” after I rescued him. He’d gotten himself wedged between the back of the pen and the wall — took me two hours to get him free and required real tools. Despite his cross look, he’s the gentlest rooster I have.

Sep 20

Some Gene Crosses Are Great, Some Not So Good…
This is the result of a Cornish Cross hen and a Buff Brahma Rooster (prolly). This guy got some of the worst traits. Really long legs, squat Cornish body, splotchy Buff / Red markings.
And he’s BIG. Brahma Big which makes the long legs even more comical.
I REALLY want to put some overalls and a hat on this Rooster and animate it to make him dance… :)
He does not have a particularly sparkling personality either.

Some Gene Crosses Are Great, Some Not So Good…

This is the result of a Cornish Cross hen and a Buff Brahma Rooster (prolly). This guy got some of the worst traits. Really long legs, squat Cornish body, splotchy Buff / Red markings.

And he’s BIG. Brahma Big which makes the long legs even more comical.

I REALLY want to put some overalls and a hat on this Rooster and animate it to make him dance… :)

He does not have a particularly sparkling personality either.

Aug 29

Meet ALOYSIUS - Bearded Blue Silkie Rooster
©Laura Quick

My friend Douglas called me the other day, he was on the road back to Los Angeles from the Central Valley. He had adopted a Silkie hen and was bringing back one of her hatch mates hoping to find a home for him. And so it was that Douglas glibly, talked me into adopting Aloysius  I don’t need another rooster, especially a 3 pound fluff-ball, but how could I resist - I just love the way he looks.

He’s a lovely bird and has been no trouble at all.

Silkies have barbless feathers, so they look furry. They have head crests, can have beards, have a black skin and blue ears. They have 5 toes on each foot, whereas most chickens have 4. Their heritage is uncertain but Marco Polo, wrote of a ‘furry’ chicken in the 13th century, during his travels in Asia. They are among the most docile breed of chicken.

Aug 04

Size, it’s a thing…Since they posed so perfectly, I took a quick shot to show the size difference between a Bantam and a Standard sized chicken at 9 weeks. These two birds hatched on the same day — he’s a Bantam Welsummer Rooster (this breed lays chocolate brown eggs) and she’s a Standard Brown Leghorn Hen (this breed lays white eggs).
Note: A standard Brown Leghorn rooster will be larger than than the hen pictured. A bantam Welsummer hen is smaller than the rooster pictured.

Size, it’s a thing…Since they posed so perfectly, I took a quick shot to show the size difference between a Bantam and a Standard sized chicken at 9 weeks. These two birds hatched on the same day — he’s a Bantam Welsummer Rooster (this breed lays chocolate brown eggs) and she’s a Standard Brown Leghorn Hen (this breed lays white eggs).

Note: A standard Brown Leghorn rooster will be larger than than the hen pictured. A bantam Welsummer hen is smaller than the rooster pictured.

May 31

FLEETWOOD
My Ameracauna Roo - his genes are most prevalent in the chicks that have been hatching out so far. Depending on the hen, we may have some interesting colored eggs.  My other roos are a Montague, a Danish Brown Leghorn, and Sheldon a dopey Buff Brahma (there is no sign of him in these chicks). These are all streets that lie between my house and the feed store.

FLEETWOOD

My Ameracauna Roo - his genes are most prevalent in the chicks that have been hatching out so far. Depending on the hen, we may have some interesting colored eggs.  My other roos are a Montague, a Danish Brown Leghorn, and Sheldon a dopey Buff Brahma (there is no sign of him in these chicks). These are all streets that lie between my house and the feed store.

May 07 Reblogged

chickenlady94:

Contemplating his existence.

Frizzle Rooster, love the wild hairdo! Whimsical.

Mar 19

GROWING CHICKENS©Laura Quick
The things no one tells you about chicken keeping, I used to have a nicely landscaped yard, now I have pots half filled with dirt and half filled with chickens rolling in the dirt.
The hen on the left is a Black Sex Link / Black Comet. The rooster in the planter is a Black Australorp. He’s romping in the planter with on the the Danish Brown Leghorn hens - who unfortunately you can’t see her as she’s laying on her back with her back with her feet up in the air.

GROWING CHICKENS
©Laura Quick

The things no one tells you about chicken keeping, I used to have a nicely landscaped yard, now I have pots half filled with dirt and half filled with chickens rolling in the dirt.

The hen on the left is a Black Sex Link / Black Comet. The rooster in the planter is a Black Australorp. He’s romping in the planter with on the the Danish Brown Leghorn hens - who unfortunately you can’t see her as she’s laying on her back with her back with her feet up in the air.

Jan 08

EASTER EGGER ROO29 weeks©Laura Quick
I had newly hatched chicks when I went past the feed store and they had a kiosk of chicks out front. I was waiting for the hay/feed guy to bring out my order when I decided to splurge on a few chicks as well. I favor Easter Eggers as they look like a hawk-like version of just about anoy other breed, and  they lay colored eggs - blue, green or pink. 
I’d started chosing chicks when the guy finished loading my car. He came over and chose this chick. It was mostly white and I thought it would grow up to be boring to look at. I also thought it would be a hen, since they were only selling hen chicks. So, not so much. 
He’s beautiful, prettier than this photo shows and has a lovely rose comb. All of his dark feathers are iridescent and he has a LOT of color on the rest of his body. I’m curious to see what his progeny will look like, and they will likely lay colored eggs depending on the hen.
Sure, he not what I expected, he’s exceeded that already. I was at the feed store today and I thanked the guy who chose him for me.

EASTER EGGER ROO
29 weeks
©Laura Quick

I had newly hatched chicks when I went past the feed store and they had a kiosk of chicks out front. I was waiting for the hay/feed guy to bring out my order when I decided to splurge on a few chicks as well. I favor Easter Eggers as they look like a hawk-like version of just about anoy other breed, and  they lay colored eggs - blue, green or pink.

I’d started chosing chicks when the guy finished loading my car. He came over and chose this chick. It was mostly white and I thought it would grow up to be boring to look at. I also thought it would be a hen, since they were only selling hen chicks. So, not so much. 

He’s beautiful, prettier than this photo shows and has a lovely rose comb. All of his dark feathers are iridescent and he has a LOT of color on the rest of his body. I’m curious to see what his progeny will look like, and they will likely lay colored eggs depending on the hen.

Sure, he not what I expected, he’s exceeded that already. I was at the feed store today and I thanked the guy who chose him for me.

Dec 07

Predator attacks my NANKINS (Natural Bantam) RIP LITTLE ONENankins (with a Standard Breed Black Cochin) in the front Pen©Laura Quick
So last night the cock crowed three times and I found myself each time running down the stairs and out to the front pen. Each time the birds seemed fine. There were no predators, and no sign of entrance. It was very puzzling. This morning the birds were all freaked out. I did a head count, all were present. When I was feeding I noticed a LOT of feathers outside the pen. I went back and did another head count.
All present.
Then, I noticed a big clump of feathers outside the pen. Upon closer inspection, it contained bone shards, some tissue and the lead wing feathers. I went back in and noticed one rooster staying a bit far away. I checked all of the others and they were fine. I lured him out with cantaloupe and brought him into the house. The predator pulled hard enough to deform the chain link, trying to pull him through, but only managed to pull the chicken’s wing through the bars and ripped part of it off.
The rooster is amazingly spry for having undergone such a serious ordeal, and is likely a lot of pain. Imagine that someone ripped off your arm at the elbow. When I brought him into the holding pen, and put him with a hen with an sore eye, he immediately started courting her. Roosters, sheesh!
I’ve sterilized the wound, and wrapped it as best I could but I’m not sure that he will survive. Bummer.
—-
I had to kill the maimed rooster. Upon closer inspection the bone was exposed, and the gaping wound was not one that I could stitch closed. I can’t imagine the pain that he was in. I’m not sure how his quality of life would be if he survived. He wouldn’t be able to fly, to mount a hen, to protect his flock. Having fallen from his lead position within the flock and may have been picked on. I held him for an hour beforehand. And I cried afterward. It’s still a soul, it’s still a life.

Predator attacks my NANKINS (Natural Bantam) RIP LITTLE ONE
Nankins (with a Standard Breed Black Cochin) in the front Pen
©Laura Quick

So last night the cock crowed three times and I found myself each time running down the stairs and out to the front pen. Each time the birds seemed fine. There were no predators, and no sign of entrance. It was very puzzling. This morning the birds were all freaked out. I did a head count, all were present. When I was feeding I noticed a LOT of feathers outside the pen. I went back and did another head count.

All present.

Then, I noticed a big clump of feathers outside the pen. Upon closer inspection, it contained bone shards, some tissue and the lead wing feathers. I went back in and noticed one rooster staying a bit far away. I checked all of the others and they were fine. I lured him out with cantaloupe and brought him into the house. The predator pulled hard enough to deform the chain link, trying to pull him through, but only managed to pull the chicken’s wing through the bars and ripped part of it off.

The rooster is amazingly spry for having undergone such a serious ordeal, and is likely a lot of pain. Imagine that someone ripped off your arm at the elbow. When I brought him into the holding pen, and put him with a hen with an sore eye, he immediately started courting her. Roosters, sheesh!

I’ve sterilized the wound, and wrapped it as best I could but I’m not sure that he will survive. Bummer.

—-

I had to kill the maimed rooster. Upon closer inspection the bone was exposed, and the gaping wound was not one that I could stitch closed. I can’t imagine the pain that he was in. I’m not sure how his quality of life would be if he survived. He wouldn’t be able to fly, to mount a hen, to protect his flock. Having fallen from his lead position within the flock and may have been picked on. I held him for an hour beforehand. And I cried afterward. It’s still a soul, it’s still a life.

Nov 08

POST COYOTE VISIT
A coyote and I just had a standoff at the front chicken pen. It didn’t take me seriously until it noticed that I was carrying a gun. Then it bolted. Lucky that those little birds,  make a racket and got my attention. 
You can tell by the photo that they are over the attack and have returned to foraging. Only the Nankin Roo far right seems at all concerned.
The front pen is my most vulnerable. It’s an 8x12’ chain link dog run that has a Mickey Moused tension wire and chicken wire roof with a tarp thrown over it. It’s in an unfenced area, though set up 4 feet off the street. For well over a year now, no predator has gotten in, I don’t say that with pride as much as with surprise, and delight.
Currently residents are six Nankin bantams and one standard Cochin (shown above), as well as the Mama Silver-Laced Wyandotte hen with her brood of eight two-week old chicks - they are enclosed in a coop. 
By the way, the coyote was gorgeous, with a beautiful coat, and I only use the gun to scare them off.

POST COYOTE VISIT

A coyote and I just had a standoff at the front chicken pen. It didn’t take me seriously until it noticed that I was carrying a gun. Then it bolted. Lucky that those little birds,  make a racket and got my attention.

You can tell by the photo that they are over the attack and have returned to foraging. Only the Nankin Roo far right seems at all concerned.

The front pen is my most vulnerable. It’s an 8x12’ chain link dog run that has a Mickey Moused tension wire and chicken wire roof with a tarp thrown over it. It’s in an unfenced area, though set up 4 feet off the street. For well over a year now, no predator has gotten in, I don’t say that with pride as much as with surprise, and delight.

Currently residents are six Nankin bantams and one standard Cochin (shown above), as well as the Mama Silver-Laced Wyandotte hen with her brood of eight two-week old chicks - they are enclosed in a coop.

By the way, the coyote was gorgeous, with a beautiful coat, and I only use the gun to scare them off.

Nov 04

AMERACAUNA BABYSupposed to be a pullet©Laura Quick
When I was choosing Ameracauna [hen] chicks at the feed store, the man working at the store got involved. He was all excited about the color of this chick. I didn’t have Ameracaunas that were not golden/black in color so I thought what the heck, and took it. While I was away, it was here on the farm maturing enough to show it’s true colors. It’s a pretty bird yes, but it’s not a hen, he’s a rooster.*
*Roosters are raining down on me from the heavens…oh my!

AMERACAUNA BABY
Supposed to be a pullet
©Laura Quick

When I was choosing Ameracauna [hen] chicks at the feed store, the man working at the store got involved. He was all excited about the color of this chick. I didn’t have Ameracaunas that were not golden/black in color so I thought what the heck, and took it. While I was away, it was here on the farm maturing enough to show it’s true colors. It’s a pretty bird yes, but it’s not a hen, he’s a rooster.*

*Roosters are raining down on me from the heavens…oh my!

Sep 10

NANKIN ROOSTER©Laura Quick
This is my smallest rooster, a Nankin. This is an unommon breed today, but it’s an old breed, likely originating in China and popular in Europe as far back as the 16th century.
These are little birds about the size of a blue jay…maybe 9 or 10 inches long by 7 or 8 inches tall. For chickens they have unusually large wings relative to their body weight so they can fly well and from an early age, but they aren’t flighty by nature. As it is naturally a tiny breed, some say the smallest, many popular bantam breeds were created by breeding down a standard size chicken with a Nankin.
I bought this breed because they are frequently broody and will brood quail eggs. I keep quail. Win-win.
I am surprised however, what a joy these little guys have turned out to be. As chicks they are TINY, all yellow each with a black dot on the top of their head. Grown the hens are a buff color with black wing tips, the roosters a rich caramel color with black /irridescent green sickles on their tail.They have odd slate legs with white toe nails…looks like a woman wearing blue stockings and white shoes.
The hens are a little reserved, but the roosters do this little happy dance whenever I come out to feed or visit them and they are surprisingly friendly, trusting birds. I let them out to run around while I clean the cage or am feeding and they never go far and key  to this — recapturing them is easy. I can’t leave them out as the cats will kill them.

NANKIN ROOSTER
©Laura Quick

This is my smallest rooster, a Nankin. This is an unommon breed today, but it’s an old breed, likely originating in China and popular in Europe as far back as the 16th century.

These are little birds about the size of a blue jay…maybe 9 or 10 inches long by 7 or 8 inches tall. For chickens they have unusually large wings relative to their body weight so they can fly well and from an early age, but they aren’t flighty by nature. As it is naturally a tiny breed, some say the smallest, many popular bantam breeds were created by breeding down a standard size chicken with a Nankin.

I bought this breed because they are frequently broody and will brood quail eggs. I keep quail. Win-win.

I am surprised however, what a joy these little guys have turned out to be. As chicks they are TINY, all yellow each with a black dot on the top of their head. Grown the hens are a buff color with black wing tips, the roosters a rich caramel color with black /irridescent green sickles on their tail.They have odd slate legs with white toe nails…looks like a woman wearing blue stockings and white shoes.

The hens are a little reserved, but the roosters do this little happy dance whenever I come out to feed or visit them and they are surprisingly friendly, trusting birds. I let them out to run around while I clean the cage or am feeding and they never go far and key  to this — recapturing them is easy. I can’t leave them out as the cats will kill them.

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