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teenytinydinosaurfarm:

IRIDESCENT FEATHERS
Before I kept chickens I always thought of them as rather drab birds that ran around farm yards, and I rarely considered roosters at all. I was so short-sighted! This is a Brown Leghorn Rooster  showing his back from shoulder (top) to tail (bottom) - gorgeous.

Plain old black and orange chicken, but in the right light, gorgeous! Gotta love iridescence. Thank you Mother Nature!
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iPhone 4S
ISO
100
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f/2.4
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1/20th
Focal Length
4mm

teenytinydinosaurfarm:

IRIDESCENT FEATHERS

Before I kept chickens I always thought of them as rather drab birds that ran around farm yards, and I rarely considered roosters at all. I was so short-sighted! This is a Brown Leghorn Rooster  showing his back from shoulder (top) to tail (bottom) - gorgeous.

Plain old black and orange chicken, but in the right light, gorgeous! Gotta love iridescence. Thank you Mother Nature!

OLD ENGLISH GAME ROOSTER - Sunday Seven #7
I inherited three of these roosters a two weeks ago. They are Carlisle Old English Games as far as I can tell. The guy who had them had eaten the other three, he didn’t brine or age the meat and then BBQ’d it - a BIG mistake as roostrs have nearly no fat, and need time and brine to make them more palatable / edible. PLUS,these roosters are probably a pound or two — smaller than a Cornish Game Hen that you’d see at the grocery / butcher. Not much meat and these peanuts re only half grown - so a lot of buck, but not a lot of bang. I was glad to take them, despite the glut of roosters I already have.
Zoom Info
Camera
Canon EOS REBEL T5i
ISO
100
Aperture
f/5.6
Exposure
1/60th
Focal Length
50mm

OLD ENGLISH GAME ROOSTER - Sunday Seven #7

I inherited three of these roosters a two weeks ago. They are Carlisle Old English Games as far as I can tell. The guy who had them had eaten the other three, he didn’t brine or age the meat and then BBQ’d it - a BIG mistake as roostrs have nearly no fat, and need time and brine to make them more palatable / edible. PLUS,these roosters are probably a pound or two — smaller than a Cornish Game Hen that you’d see at the grocery / butcher. Not much meat and these peanuts re only half grown - so a lot of buck, but not a lot of bang. I was glad to take them, despite the glut of roosters I already have.

MODIFIED COQ AU VINliterally Rooster in wine
The French, man they know their way around tenderizing tough meat. This is terrific.
Organically raised roosters — no steroids, no crap food, no tiny cages, no saline injected into the meat. These bad boy lived with me so I know their life story intimately.
I had them butchered* and cleaned professionally. Rooster has to be rested and aged before eating or it will be very tough.
I cut them up first then brined them for 3 days in wine, herbs, cajun spices, olive oil and salt. Today I baked them in a modified Dutch Oven in wine, herbs, spices and olive oil. I skipped the heavy cream in the original recipe, but DAMN! Yum.
This dish? It’s something to crow about, and fall off the bone tender. Great flavor too.
I thought I would be squeamish, but instead I’m deeply grateful.
There are three roosters in this pot, anyone want to join me?
—-
*having the birds butchered was a very difficult decision to make as I raise my birds from chicks/eggs and interact with them daily. Sadly, too many roosters are hard on the hen flock. Unless the hen is willing, and sometimes they are, a rooster will grab a hen by the head and drag her down, then stand on her back grabbing onto her neck feathers with his beak and her back feathers with his claws while mating with her. When you have too many roosters - several will breed with her at the same time. The hens end up bald with featherless necks and backs. 
Roosters penned together can get along, but they can also turn on a dime and fight until they are both bloody. This happened recently here among two roosters who had lived together for 3 years in peace. 
In this case, a farmer hired me to incubate out a bunch of chicks for him last winter, he never came for them. I sold off some, but ended up keeping the rest including with a slew of roosters. I would not sell a rooster chick intentionally to an unsuspecting neighbor or local. There are people who do, but it’s a crappy thing to do.
I didn’t want the bird to go to waste.
Zoom Info
Camera
Canon EOS REBEL T5i
ISO
400
Aperture
f/4.5
Exposure
1/60th
Focal Length
34mm

MODIFIED COQ AU VIN
literally Rooster in wine

The French, man they know their way around tenderizing tough meat. This is terrific.

Organically raised roosters — no steroids, no crap food, no tiny cages, no saline injected into the meat. These bad boy lived with me so I know their life story intimately.

I had them butchered* and cleaned professionally. Rooster has to be rested and aged before eating or it will be very tough.

I cut them up first then brined them for 3 days in wine, herbs, cajun spices, olive oil and salt. Today I baked them in a modified Dutch Oven in wine, herbs, spices and olive oil. I skipped the heavy cream in the original recipe, but DAMN! Yum.

This dish? It’s something to crow about, and fall off the bone tender. Great flavor too.

I thought I would be squeamish, but instead I’m deeply grateful.

There are three roosters in this pot, anyone want to join me?

—-

*having the birds butchered was a very difficult decision to make as I raise my birds from chicks/eggs and interact with them daily. Sadly, too many roosters are hard on the hen flock. Unless the hen is willing, and sometimes they are, a rooster will grab a hen by the head and drag her down, then stand on her back grabbing onto her neck feathers with his beak and her back feathers with his claws while mating with her. When you have too many roosters - several will breed with her at the same time. The hens end up bald with featherless necks and backs.

Roosters penned together can get along, but they can also turn on a dime and fight until they are both bloody. This happened recently here among two roosters who had lived together for 3 years in peace.

In this case, a farmer hired me to incubate out a bunch of chicks for him last winter, he never came for them. I sold off some, but ended up keeping the rest including with a slew of roosters. I would not sell a rooster chick intentionally to an unsuspecting neighbor or local. There are people who do, but it’s a crappy thing to do.

I didn’t want the bird to go to waste.

Words I never thought I’d say…

Who Me? Oh, I’m just over here brining a few roosters…

Here’s what I’ve learned:

  1. Roosters don’t have a lot of fat on them like commercial hens do.
  2. Reportedly they are tough if they are not aged, brined, or slow cooked (until the meat falls off the bone).
  3. Had I known this I would have aged the other birds before adding them to the deep freeze. Ahh, who am I kidding I didn’t have room in the fridge for any more birds. And I was more than a little verklempt about the whole subject
  4. These birds anyway have very tight joints

I’m probably going overboard, but I did an 8-way cut, and now I’ve got three birds in a brine of in white wine, rosemary, herbs, bay leaves, garlic, some Cajun spices, kosher salt, pepper, a little palm sugar, some coconut aminos (soy sauce alternative), and olive oil. It smells divine!

Brining overnight or for a couple of days will give me a chance to figure out how I want to cook these guys.

The only saving grace by the way, is already knowing what a chicken looks / is built like and having worked with whole birds before. It makes it easier for me to distance myself from these being my birds.

Did I mention how much more peaceful and relaxed the farm is now?!

I thought I’d be more squeamish, but the reality is, I know that these birds were raised as cleanly and organically as possible. No hormones, no steroids, no-GMO feed. They were uncaged and had a pretty stress-free life. I don’t want to let them go to waste.

DARK BRAHMA ROO
This tiny rooster realized that he could crow this morning. This was taken just after he crowed for the first time. I like that he looks a little puzzled. He’s still warming up his vocal cords, but now from the safe distance of the greenhouse. Youngest rooster to crow that I’ve ever had. And Brahmas tend to mature slowly. Yikes, lol.

//
Zoom Info
Camera
Canon EOS REBEL T5i
ISO
100
Aperture
f/6.3
Exposure
1/100th
Focal Length
55mm

DARK BRAHMA ROO

This tiny rooster realized that he could crow this morning. This was taken just after he crowed for the first time. I like that he looks a little puzzled. He’s still warming up his vocal cords, but now from the safe distance of the greenhouse. Youngest rooster to crow that I’ve ever had. And Brahmas tend to mature slowly. Yikes, lol.

DOUBLE LACED BARNEVELDER HEN & ROO

This are quick becoming one of my favorite breeds. They are friendly birds with beautiful feathering. I love the iridescence off the black in their feathers. The top is a young rooster (he’s even prettier now), and the bottom is a pullet, both at about 24 weeks.

The Barnevelder is a medium heavy dual breed (meat/egg) chicken named after the Dutch town of Barneveld. Between c. 1850 and 1875 many breeds were arriving in the West from Asia and being crossed with each other and with local chickens to create new/better breeds. One of the meat breeds was a black bird that was crossed with Brahmas, then Langshen, then Golden Wyandottes eventually breeding true and producing the Barnevelder.

The Barnevelder today is known for laying dark brown eggs — though mine lay dark enough eggs, they are not nearly as dark as a Maran’s chocolate-brown eggs.

The trade-off though is that these birds are beautiful.

A Possible Doukey?
VasolineJesus was looking for a Halloween kid deterrent…and all this time I have had the answer in my yard. This Nankin rooster I call him Jackass, but we can change his name to Doukey…he’s the smallest natural breed of chicken so about a pound of trouble, and S-H-R-I-L-L, Shit Howdy can he screech. I have two of them, so they can come as a matched set or individually. Even the Nankin hens avoid them.
Zoom Info
Camera
Canon EOS DIGITAL REBEL XTi
ISO
800
Aperture
f/8
Exposure
1/125th
Focal Length
25mm

A Possible Doukey?

VasolineJesus was looking for a Halloween kid deterrent…and all this time I have had the answer in my yard. This Nankin rooster I call him Jackass, but we can change his name to Doukey…he’s the smallest natural breed of chicken so about a pound of trouble, and S-H-R-I-L-L, Shit Howdy can he screech. I have two of them, so they can come as a matched set or individually. Even the Nankin hens avoid them.

Scowling Rooster is Scowly
Lol, this is the happy face of my Brahma Rooster “Big Red” after I rescued him. He’d gotten himself wedged between the back of the pen and the wall — took me two hours to get him free and required real tools. Despite his cross look, he’s the gentlest rooster I have.
Zoom Info
Camera
Canon EOS DIGITAL REBEL XTi
ISO
200
Aperture
f/5.6
Exposure
1/60th
Focal Length
80mm

Scowling Rooster is Scowly

Lol, this is the happy face of my Brahma Rooster “Big Red” after I rescued him. He’d gotten himself wedged between the back of the pen and the wall — took me two hours to get him free and required real tools. Despite his cross look, he’s the gentlest rooster I have.

Some Gene Crosses Are Great, Some Not So Good…
This is the result of a Cornish Cross hen and a Buff Brahma Rooster (prolly). This guy got some of the worst traits. Really long legs, squat Cornish body, splotchy Buff / Red markings.
And he’s BIG. Brahma Big which makes the long legs even more comical.
I REALLY want to put some overalls and a hat on this Rooster and animate it to make him dance… :)
He does not have a particularly sparkling personality either.
Zoom Info
Camera
Canon EOS DIGITAL REBEL XTi
ISO
200
Aperture
f/5.6
Exposure
1/80th
Focal Length
46mm

Some Gene Crosses Are Great, Some Not So Good…

This is the result of a Cornish Cross hen and a Buff Brahma Rooster (prolly). This guy got some of the worst traits. Really long legs, squat Cornish body, splotchy Buff / Red markings.

And he’s BIG. Brahma Big which makes the long legs even more comical.

I REALLY want to put some overalls and a hat on this Rooster and animate it to make him dance… :)

He does not have a particularly sparkling personality either.

Meet ALOYSIUS - Bearded Blue Silkie Rooster©Laura Quick
My friend Douglas called me the other day, he was on the road back to Los Angeles from the Central Valley. He had adopted a Silkie hen and was bringing back one of her hatch mates hoping to find a home for him. And so it was that Douglas glibly, talked me into adopting Aloysius  I don’t need another rooster, especially a 3 pound fluff-ball, but how could I resist - I just love the way he looks.
He’s a lovely bird and has been no trouble at all. 
Silkies have barbless feathers, so they look furry. They have head crests, can have beards, have a black skin and blue ears. They have 5 toes on each foot, whereas most chickens have 4. Their heritage is uncertain but Marco Polo, wrote of a ‘furry’ chicken in the 13th century, during his travels in Asia. They are among the most docile breed of chicken.
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Meet ALOYSIUS - Bearded Blue Silkie Rooster©Laura Quick
My friend Douglas called me the other day, he was on the road back to Los Angeles from the Central Valley. He had adopted a Silkie hen and was bringing back one of her hatch mates hoping to find a home for him. And so it was that Douglas glibly, talked me into adopting Aloysius  I don’t need another rooster, especially a 3 pound fluff-ball, but how could I resist - I just love the way he looks.
He’s a lovely bird and has been no trouble at all. 
Silkies have barbless feathers, so they look furry. They have head crests, can have beards, have a black skin and blue ears. They have 5 toes on each foot, whereas most chickens have 4. Their heritage is uncertain but Marco Polo, wrote of a ‘furry’ chicken in the 13th century, during his travels in Asia. They are among the most docile breed of chicken.
Zoom Info

Meet ALOYSIUS - Bearded Blue Silkie Rooster
©Laura Quick

My friend Douglas called me the other day, he was on the road back to Los Angeles from the Central Valley. He had adopted a Silkie hen and was bringing back one of her hatch mates hoping to find a home for him. And so it was that Douglas glibly, talked me into adopting Aloysius  I don’t need another rooster, especially a 3 pound fluff-ball, but how could I resist - I just love the way he looks.

He’s a lovely bird and has been no trouble at all.

Silkies have barbless feathers, so they look furry. They have head crests, can have beards, have a black skin and blue ears. They have 5 toes on each foot, whereas most chickens have 4. Their heritage is uncertain but Marco Polo, wrote of a ‘furry’ chicken in the 13th century, during his travels in Asia. They are among the most docile breed of chicken.

Size, it’s a thing…Since they posed so perfectly, I took a quick shot to show the size difference between a Bantam and a Standard sized chicken at 9 weeks. These two birds hatched on the same day — he’s a Bantam Welsummer Rooster (this breed lays chocolate brown eggs) and she’s a Standard Brown Leghorn Hen (this breed lays white eggs).
Note: A standard Brown Leghorn rooster will be larger than than the hen pictured. A bantam Welsummer hen is smaller than the rooster pictured.
Zoom Info
Camera
Canon EOS DIGITAL REBEL XTi
ISO
100
Aperture
f/4.5
Exposure
1/60th
Focal Length
50mm

Size, it’s a thing…Since they posed so perfectly, I took a quick shot to show the size difference between a Bantam and a Standard sized chicken at 9 weeks. These two birds hatched on the same day — he’s a Bantam Welsummer Rooster (this breed lays chocolate brown eggs) and she’s a Standard Brown Leghorn Hen (this breed lays white eggs).

Note: A standard Brown Leghorn rooster will be larger than than the hen pictured. A bantam Welsummer hen is smaller than the rooster pictured.

FLEETWOOD
My Ameracauna Roo - his genes are most prevalent in the chicks that have been hatching out so far. Depending on the hen, we may have some interesting colored eggs.  My other roos are a Montague, a Danish Brown Leghorn, and Sheldon a dopey Buff Brahma (there is no sign of him in these chicks). These are all streets that lie between my house and the feed store.
Zoom Info
Camera
Canon EOS DIGITAL REBEL XTi
ISO
200
Aperture
f/5.6
Exposure
1/60th
Focal Length
80mm

FLEETWOOD

My Ameracauna Roo - his genes are most prevalent in the chicks that have been hatching out so far. Depending on the hen, we may have some interesting colored eggs.  My other roos are a Montague, a Danish Brown Leghorn, and Sheldon a dopey Buff Brahma (there is no sign of him in these chicks). These are all streets that lie between my house and the feed store.

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